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Full text of "Medic : the 1940 yearbook of the Hahnemann Medical College"

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MILTON ACKERMAN, Editor-in-Chief FRANK A. VERI, Business Manager 








PUBLISHED BY THE SENIOR CLASS OF THE 

HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 




DR. WILLIAM 
ALEXANDER PEARSON 



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T -1 HE administration of the affairs of a medical 
-L school, and the wise solution of the myriad prob- 
lems which must every day confront such an ad- 
ministrator is, in itself, a task calling for rare quali- 
ties in an individual, and rarer still is the man who 
can rise above the mundane duties of administration 
and yet not lose the common touch with those whom 
it is his duty to guide. 

Therefore — in recognition of his capable adminis- 
tration, his masterful teaching, his humane friendli- 
ness, and above all, for his profound faith in a 
glorious destiny for Hahnemann and the men of 
Hahnemann — we, the class of Nineteen Hundred 
and Forty, dedicate this, our class book to 



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Memories of the past may oft be 
clouded by the realities of the present. 
So . . . if . . . ten or fifty years from now 
... a perusal of these pages may recall 
to mind ... a youthful ideal discarded 
... a happy hour spent ... or the face 
of a friend forgotten . . . the time and 
the effort consumed in the preparation 
of this book . . . will not have been in 
vain. 



Editor-in-Chief. 



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COLLEGE 

FACULTY 

SENIORS 

UNDERCLASSES 

FRATERNITIES 

ACTIVITIES 

VARIA 




WILLIAM A. PEARSON, M.D., Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D. 

Dean of the College 



10 THE CLASS OF 1940 



» » 



IN my long and intimate contact with hundreds of medical students. I am convinced 
that each student undergoes material change during his formal medical education. It is 
to be expected that any individual living in the environment of a medical college and 
directing his thoughts in medical channels for four years would become a definite type. 
Not only is this a fact, but environment and time are necessary for medical students to 
realize that the practice of medicine requires extensive professional knowledge before 
the responsibility of a physician can be assumed properly. 

Samuel Hahnemann said that it is criminal to neglect any information which may be 
of value to a future patient. I trust sincerely that each member of the Class of 1940 will 
keep this admonition in mind and also the many advantages which this training in 
Homeopathy affords him. 

The members of the Class of 1940 must accept soon the numerous responsibilities of 
medical practice and each should be a loyal son of Hahnemann and observe the highest 
traditions of his Alma Mater. 

I am truly grateful for the compliment of having this classbook dedicated to me and 
wish the fullest measure of success to each member of the Class of 1940. 





FREDERICK J. vonRAPP, Litt.D.. LL.D. 

Provost and Executive Vice-President 



10 THE CLASS OP 1940 



» » 



"Man is not put into the world as a music box set wth a fixed 
number of tunes, but as a violin with infinite possibilities." 

YOU have been given the opportunity at Hahnemann to prepare you selves to face a 
complicated and difficult world in which you must function. Entering a profession 
whose rewards embrace so many of the finer things in life, should be the means of 
developing in you the highest ideals, the acquisition of which can only bring happiness. 
Pride in things well done and an appreciative affection and sincere interest in your work 
on the part of those you have been fortunate enough to assist physically and mentally, 
await you. May your ambition to reach the highest attainment in your profession be 
tempered with those lovable traits of kindness, patience, and sympathy, guided by which 
you will arrive at that enviable state in life known as success. Those who have been 
responsible for your development in medical knowledge and technique will be keenly 
aware of your advancement and follow your career with interest, believing that you will 
measure up to their faith in you. 

In planning your future do include in it a journey to your Alma Mater at certain 
intervals and refresh your mind at this fountain of know ledge, by a post-graduate course 
in the selected subjects you will find so necessary. 

Go forth with the determination that you will live up to the ethical standards of your 
profession, no matter what the economic picture may be. looking forward only to that day 
when such a career and purpose will bring you self-respect and the great esteem of those 
who know you. 




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CHRISTIAN 



FREDERICK SAMUEL HAHNEMANN 



CHRISTIAN FREDERICK SAMUEL HAHNEMANN, one of the great figures in 
medicine, was born in Meissen, Germany, on April 10, 1755. Very early in his 
schooling he exhibited the brilliance that distinguished him throughout life. His skill 
as a linguist broadened his knowledge and facilitated his studies at Leipsic. From this 
school he graduated as a Doctor of Medicine in 1779. His perspicacity early revealed to 
him the chaotic state of therapy, then prevailing. Complacency in this matter was in- 
compatible with his disposition and learning. His quest for a solution drove him about 
Germany practicing Medicine and Psychiatry, experimenting in Chemistry — and in this 
he had few peers — but always studying, always writing. His work had already disting- 
uished him as a physician. In 1796 his travail terminated. The principles of homoeopathy 
were enunciated. He returned to Leipsic to teach Medicine. In the years that followed 
he elaborated, further applied, and taught his findings. He acquired followers who dis- 
seminated and modified his teachings yet cleaving to the principles and methods of Hahne- 
mann. His innovations were not received as manna. Very early the refractoriness of 
medical men even in his day was apparent. This served only to characterize the spread 
of his principles with a virile turbulence. With an arduous life behind him rest was vital. 
This he found for a short time in Paris where he died in 1843. In his bequest to Medicine 
was a lesson in the urgency for acuity of observation, and a rule of therapy, where for- 
merly none existed. 

T. R. COUNIHAN 




JOSEPH S. CONWELL. SR., LL. B. 

PRESIDENT OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Charles A. Allen 
Addison R. Brown 
David Burpee 
J. Warner Butterworth 
William H. Clayton 
Joseph S. Conwell 



Thomas G. Hawkes 
Charles E. Kenworthey 
Philip C. Snow- 
Frederic H. Strawbridge, Jr. 
Frederic J. von Rapp 
Victor Wierman, Jr. 
E. Burke Wilford 



Honorary President, Charles D. Barney, M.A. 



OFFICERS 

President Joseph S. Conwell 

Senior Vice President Philip C. Snow 

Junior Vice President Thomas G. Hawkes 

Provost and Executive Vice President Frederic J. von Rapp 

Secretary Victor Wierman, Jr. 

Treasurer Fidelity - Phila. Trust Co. 

Solicitor Charles E. Kenworthey 




HAHNEMANN HOSPITAL 




HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 




HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 



T 



HE vast and complex organization 
that is today — Hahnemann Medical 
College and Hospital of Philadelphia 
had its simple beginnings in a phy- 
sican's office at the corner of Julianna 
and Vine Streets on a February day in 
1848. On that day, Dr. Jacob Jeans, Dr. 
Walter Williamson, and Dr. Constantine 
Hering met in Dr. Jeans office, and de- 
cided to apply to the Pennsylvania 
Legislature, then in session, for a med- 
ical school charter. It was the desire of these men to found a homeopathic 
medical school, where the student who desired a knowledge of the practice of 
homeopathy, might acquire such a knowledge systematically; and not, and 
had been the custom previously, by serving a haphazard apprenticeship under 
a practitioner of that art. The charter was granted, and on April 8, 1848, the 
Homeopathic Medical College of Pennsylvania, the college now considered as 
the old school, was incorporated. 

And so, the impetus having been initiated by the three founders; the 
homeopathic physicians of the city set themselves to the task of procuring 
funds and obtaining a building where classes might be held. A building was 
leased at 229 Arch Street, a faculty appointed, and on Monday evening, Oc- 
tober 16, 1848, the opening session of the old college was held. Classes started 
the next day under the direction of a faculty consisting of: Caleb B. Matthews, 
M.D., Materia Medica; Walter Williamson, M.D., Midwifery and Diseases of 
Women and Children; Francis Sims, M.D., Surgery; Samuel Freedly, M.D., 
Botany; Matthew Semple, M.D., Chemistry; William A. Gardiner, M.D., Anat- 
omy; Alvan E. Small, M.D., Physiology; and Alvan E. Small, M.D., Pathology. 
The first year found fifteen students paying the $100 course fee, a $10 anatomy 
fee, and a $15 graduation fee, to attend classes. The year terminated with 
graduation exercises which were held March 15, 1849 in Music Fund Hall at 
which six men were graduated. 

The success of the first session of the old college demonstrated to the 

founders that more adequate facilities would be necessary if the college was 

to continue to grow and prosper, and so, during the summer of 1849, 

HAHNEMANN a searc h was made for larger quarters. These were found in a struc- 

HO^PTTAT * ure l° ca * e d on the North side of Filbert Street between Eleventh and 

15th StreetU 887- -1938) 




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12th Streets (now the 
site of the Reading 
Terminal), which had 
formerly been occu- 
pied by the Pennsyl- 
vania College of 
Medicine. The open- 
ing lectures of the 
second session of the 
old college was held 
on the evening of 
October 1, 1849, in 
this building. 

The old college con- 
tinued its existence 
in this location until 
1869. These years, 
however, found the 
college beset with fi- 
nancial difficulties which were partially solved by 
making the school a stock corporation. This move, 
however, permitted one of the faculty to become the 
majority stockholder and the distatorial manners he 
assumed in his control of the school initiated a wid- 
ening breech between himself and one of the found- 
ers, Constantine Hering. The break finally came in 
1865 with Hering resigning from his lectureship in 
protest over the abolishment of the chair of pathology 
by the majority stockholder. 

Hering determined to start another college be- 
lieving that the old college was no longer serving 
its purpose as a school where students might acquire 
a homeopathic education as part of a well rounded 
medical course. He secured the charter of the 
Washington Medical College, which had been char- 




HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE 
North Broad Street (1886 - 1929) 




THE OLD 
HOSPITAL 

tered in Pennsylvania in 
1853, and which had ap- 
parently never held 
classes. In July, 1867 he 
secured a court order 
changing the name of the 
originally chartered school 
to the Hahnemann Medi- 
cal College of Philadel- 
phia. Thus began what is 
now considered to be the 
new college. The second 
and third floors of a build- 
ing at 1307 Chestnut Street 
were rented and the new 
college began classes on 
October 13, 1867. The first 
session ended with a com- 
mencement at Music Fund Hall on March 4, 1868. For its second and last ses- 
sion, the new college moved to a building at 18 North 10th Street, and this ses- 
sion ended with a commencement at the Academy of Music on March 3, 1869. 

In the meantime, most of the faculty of the old college, being in sympathy 
with Hering, were attempting to work out a plan for the union of the two col- 
leges. The opportunity to consummate this union was afforded in 1869 when 
the dominant stockholder of- 
fered to sell his holdings in the 
old college. With Dr. Walter 
Williamson acting as the agent 
for Hering, the deal was trans- 
acted, and the major portion of 
the stock of the old college was 
transferred to Dr. Hering. The 
two colleges were legally 
merged by an act of the Legis- 
lature on April 2, 1869, and a 
supplementary act on March 
1 1, 1870; and so the old Homeo- 
pathic Medical College of Penn- 
sylvania passed out of exist- 
ance, and the Hahnemann Med- 
ical College became the only 
homeopathic medical college in 
Philadelphia. 

The combined college, lo- 
cated at the old Filbert Street 
address, grew steadily in size, 
wealth, and faculty, until final- 
ly, the increasing numbers of 
students made it imperative 
that more adequate facilities be 



THE OLD 
SCHOOL 



r 





■■■■■■ 



HAHNEMANN OF THE FUTURE 



obtained. So, we find the subject of a new college and hospital being dis- 
cussed in 1880. This ended in the purchase of ground on the west side of North 
Broad Street between Race and Vine Streets. The cornerstone for the new 
building was placed on November 6, 1884. Thus, with the session beginning 
on September 27, 1886, the college moved from the now inadequate Filbert 
Street quarters into the new North Broad Street buildings. This building con- 
tinued as the college building until 1928, when it was torn down to make way 
for the new hospital, and the college moved into the only hospital building 
fronting on North 15th Street. The college remained in the old hospital build- 
ing until 1938, when this building was partially razed to make way for the con- 
struction of the new college building. 




i \ \ 



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KLAHR AUDITORIUM 




NEW 

LECTURE 

ROOM 



SCHOOL LIBRARY 



H 





ANATOMY LABORATORY 



CHEMISTRY 
LABORATORY 




PATHOLOGY LABORATORY 




R UFUS B. WEAVER 





1841-1936 




HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE is the proud pos- 
sessor of the most renowned specimen of anatomical 
dissection of its type, known to medicine. This specimen, 
known as "Harriet", is a complete dissection of the human 
cerebro-spinal nervous system. 

Harriet was a maid employed by Dr. Weaver. For 
years she suffered from, tuberculosis, and before she died, 
she requested that her body be used to benefit science. 
This was a benevolent gesture, for in those days when 
superstition reigned, doctors and scientists had difficulty 
in obtaining cadavers for dissection and study. Therefore, 
when Harriet passed away in 1887, Dr. Weaver proceed- 
ed, after much deliberation and research, to carry out her 
wish in a way that was most worthy of her generosity and 
humanitarianism. He finally produced the specimen 
which we now possess, a scientific achievement that has 
rewarded Harriet's kindness by rendering her immortal. 

Up until the time Dr. Weaver undertook this unusual 
task, such work had never before been attempted, and 
the completed specimen, the preparation and mounting of 
which consumed six months of exacting labor, stands as 
ct masterpiece of perserverance and skill — a tribute to the 
patience of Dr. Weaver and an everlasting monument to 
his mastery of woman anatomy. 



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EULOGY OF THE DOCTOR 



T -1 HERE are men and classes of men that stand above the ccm- 
■*■ mon herd: the soldier, the sailor, the shepherd, not infre- 
quently; the artist rarely; rarelier still, the clergyman; the phy- 
sican almost as a rule. 

He is the flower (such as it is) of our civilization; and when 
that stage of man is done with, and only remembered to be mar- 
veled at in history, he will be thought to have shared as little as 
any in the virtues of the race. 

Generosity he has, such as is possible to those who practice 
an art, never to those who drive a trade; discretion, tested by a 
hundred secrets; tact, tried in a thousand embarrassments, and 
what are more important, Herculean cheerfulness and courage. 
So it is that he brings aid and cheer into the sickroom, and often 
enough, though not so often as he wishes, brings healing. 

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON. 




JOHN EDWIN JAMES, JR.. B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics 



WAYNE T. KILLIAN, M.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Anesthesia 





FRANK O. NAGLE, A.M., M.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Ophthalmology 



GILBERT J. PALEN, A.B., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor Emeritus of Otology 





SAMUEL W. SAPPINGTON, M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Pathology and 
Bacteriology 



M.D. Hahnemann Medical College, 1897; Fellow 
American College of Physicians, Fellow American 
Medical Association, Philadelphia Homeopathic 
Medical Society, Pennsylvania Homeopathic Med- 
ical Society American Institute of Homeopathy, 
Philadelphia Pathological Society, American Asso- 
ciation of Immunologists, American Society of Clin- 
ical Pathologists, Society of American Bacteriologists, 
Pathologist to Hahnemann Hospital, Physician to 
Hahnemann Hospital. 





WILLIAM A. PEARSON, Ph,C Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D., LL.D. 

Dean of the College 

Professor and Head of the Department of Chemistry and 

Physiological Chemistry 



Ph.C., University of Michigan, 1900; Ph.D., Univers- 
ity of Michigan, 1902; Sc.D., LaSalle College.. 1926; 
M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1915; LL.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College, 1935; American Chem- 
istry Society, American Pharmaceutical Association, 
American Association of Clinical Research, Amer- 
ican Institute of Homeopathy, Pennsylvania State 
Homeopathic Medical Society, Research Chemist, 
Parke-Davis, 1900-1904, Professor of Chemistry, Fer- 
his Institute, Big Rapids, Michigan, 1904-1906. 





LEON T. ASHCRAFT, Ph.B., A.M., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Urology 



PhB., Dickinson College, 1887; A.M., Dickinson 
College, 1890; M. D., Hahnemann Medical College, 
1890; A.M., Hahnemann Medical College, 1931; LL.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College, 1937; Pi Upsilon Rho, 
American College of Surgeons, Urologist to Hahne- 
mann Hospital, Urologist to Women's Homeopathic 
Hospital, Urologist to Broad Street Hospital. 





CHARLES SIGMUND RAUE, A.M., M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Pediatrics 



University of Pennsylvania, M.D., Hahnemann 
Medical College, 1895; Philadelphia Pediatric So- 
ciety, American Institute of Homeopathy, Pennsyl- 
vania Homeopathic Medical Society, Philadelphia 
Homeopathic Medical Society, Physician to Children, 
Hahnemann Hospital; Consulting Physician to St. 
Luke's and Children's Homeopathic Hospital, Con- 
sulting Physician to Women's Homeopathic Hospital, 
Head of Department of Pediatrics St. Luke's and 
Children's Homeopathic Hospital. 





HARRY MARTIN EBERHARD, M.A., M.D., LL.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Gastroenterology 



Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., 1898; Post-Graduate work: 
University of Berlin, Boas Polyklinic, Berlin, Boston Floating Hospital, Boston 
City Hospital, New York Graduate Medical School. Societies: Pi Upsilon Rho, 
Germantown Medical Society, Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, 
Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, American Society for the Advancement of Science, Philadelphia County 
Medical Society, Medical Club, Philadelphia. Fellow, American Gastroenter- 
oloical Association; Fellow, American Medical Association; Associate, Amer- 
ican College of Physicians, Gastroenterologist to Broad Street Hospital, Con- 
sulting Gastroenterologist to Women's Homeopathic 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Consultant Gastroenterology 
J. Lewis Crozier Hospital, Chester, Physician to 
Hahnemann Hospital, Shriner's Hospital for Crippled 
Children, Philadelphia. 





EDWARD A. STEINHILBER, M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Neurology and 
Psychiatry 



M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1909; Phi 
Alpha Gamma, Associate Professor of Histology and 
Embryology, 1914-1925; Neurologist to Hahnemann 
Hospital. 





GARTH WILKINSON BOERICKE, M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Materia Medica 
and Therapeutics 



University of California, 1914; M.D., University of 
Michigan, 1918; Alpha Sigma, Past President Amer- 
ican Institute of Homeopathy, President Pennsyl- 
vania Homeopathic Medical Society, Editor Hahne- 
mannian Monthly, Physician to Hahnemann Hos- 
pital, Director of Hering Laboratory. 





G. HARLAN WELLS, B.S., M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Medicine 



B.S., University of Delaware, 1898; M.D., Hahne- 
mann Medical College, 1902; Sc.D., University of 
Delaware, 1934; Pi Upsilon Rho, American College 
of Physicians, Former President American Institute 
of Homeopathy, Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical 
Society, Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, 
Physician-in-Chief to Hahnemann Hospital, Consult- 
ing Physician to the Woman's Homeopathic Hospital, 
the Broad Street Hospital, the West Jersey Homeo- 
pathic Hospital, the Crozer Hospital, and the Wil- 
mington Homeopathic Hospital. 





EARL B. CRAIG, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Gynecology 



M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, M.D., Jefferson 
Medical College, 1908; American College of Sur- 
geons, Member of American Board of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology, Philadelphia Obstetrical Society, Gyne- 
cologist to Hahnemann Hospital. 





THOMAS W. PHILLIPS, M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department Anatomy 



M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1916; Univers- 
ity of Pennsylvania, 1923; St. Mark's, London, 1923; 
Post-Graduate Surgery, Post-Graduate Proctology, 
Pi Upsilon Rho, American Institute of Homeopathy, 
American Association for Advancement of Science, 
American Medical Association. 





GUSTAVE A. VAN LENNEP, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Surgery 



M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1894; Amer- 
ican Board of Surgeons, American College of Sur- 
geons, Germantown Medical Society, Tri-County 
Medical Society, Medical Club of Philadelphia, 
Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, Penn- 
sylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, American 
Institute of Homeopathy, Surgeon to Hahnemann 
Hospital, Consulting Surgeon, Allentown State Hos- 
pital, Consulting Surgeon, Pottstown Homeopathic 
Hospital, Consulting Surgeon, West Jersey Homeo- 
pathic Hospital. 





REINHARD BEUTNER, Ph.D., M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Pharmacology 



Ph.D., M.D., University of Berlin, 1936; International 
Research Anesthesia Society, American Society for 
Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics,; 1911- 
1914, Assistant at Rockefeller Institute for Medical 
Research; 1920-1923.. Chief Assistant, Pharmacolog- 
ical Institute, University of Leyden, Holland; 1924- 
1936, Assistant Professor, Professor of Pharmacology, 
University of Louisville. 





STANLEY P. REIMANN, M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Oncology 



University of Pennsylvania Medical College, Director of the Lankenau Hos- 
pital Research Institute, Chief of the Division of Cancer Control of the Penna. 
State Department of Health, Associate Professor of Experimental Pathology in 
the University of Pennsylvania, Director of the American Society for the Control 
of Cancer, Chairman of the Cancer Commission of the Medical Society of the 
State of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia College of Physicians, American Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, Philadelphia County Medical Society, 
American Medical Association, Federation of Biological Societies, American 
Society for Experimental Pathology, American Association of Pathologists and 
Bacteriologists, American Association for Cancer Re- 
search, Society for Experimental Biology and Medi- 
cine, Committee on Pathological Anatomy of the 
National Research Council, Society of the Sigma Xi, 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists, Deutsche 
Pathologische Gesellschaft, Member of the Executive 
Committee of the International Union Against Can- 
cer, Member Board of Director of Philadelphia Health 
Council and Tuberculosis Committee, Fellow of 
American College of Physician. 







'wasmSSKFL 




JOHN C. SCOTT, A.B., Ph.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Physioloy 



A.B., University of Montana, 1923; Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania, 1929; American Psychological 
Society. 





WARREN C. MERCER, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Obstetrics 



Martin's Academy, West Chester Normal School, 
M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1899; Philadel- 
phia Homeopathic Medical Society, Pennsylvania 
Homeopathic Medical Society, American Institute of 
Homeopathy, Germantown Medical Society, Clinical 
Research Society, Pi Upsilon Rho, Obstetrican to 
Hahnemann Hosptal, President of the Staff of Broad 
Street Hospital, Chief Obstetrician to Broad Street 
Hospital, Head of Department of Women of St. Luke's 
and Children's Homeopathic Hospitals, Consulting 
Obstetrician, Women's Homeopathic Hospital, West 
Chester, Pa.; Consultant, Homeopathic Hospital and 
Crozier Hospital of Chester, Pa.; Consultant, Mercy 
Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 





FREDERICK C. PETERS, M.D. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Ophthalmology 



M.D., Hahneman Medical College, 1911; Alpha 
Sigma, Ophthalmologist to Hahnemann Hospital, In- 
structor in Ophthalmological Pathology, Ophthalmol- 
ogist to Allentown State Hospital, Chief Ophthalmol- 
ogist to St. Luke's and Children's Homeopathic Hos- 
pital. 





JOSEPH V. F. CLAY, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of the Department of Oto-laryngology 



M.D., Hahneman Medical College, 1906; Alpha 
Sigma, American College of Surgeons, American 
Board of Oto-laryngology, Fellow of the American 
Medical Association, Philadelphia Homeopathic 
Medical Society, Pennsylvania State Medical So- 
ceity, Philadelphia Society for Clinical Research, 
Otologist to Hahnemann Hospital. 





RALPH BERNSTEIN. M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Professor and Head of the Section of 
Dermatology 

M.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1903; 
M.D., Hahnemann Medical College. 1904; F.A. 
C.P., American College of Physicians, 1920; 
Fellow American Academy of Dermatology 
and Syphilology, Pi Upsilon Rho, Society for 
Investigative Dermatology, Society of Foren- 
sic Medicine, American Medical Authors As- 
sociation, County, State, and National Homeo- 
pathic Medical Societies, Germantown 
Homeopathic Medical Society, Consuting Der- 
matologist to Hahnemann Hospital, Women's 
Homeopathic Hospital, Broad Street Hospital, 
Shriners' Children's Hospital, Crozer Hos- 
pital. Chester, Pa.; Homeopathic Hospital, 
Wilmington, Del.; Homeopathic Hospital, 
Pottstown, Pa.; Allentown State Hospital, Al- 
lentown, Pa.; West Jersey Homeopathic Hos- 
pital, Camden, N. J.. Bancroft School, Had- 
donfield N. J. 




JACOB WILLIAM FRANK. M.D. 

Professor of Roentgenology 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1905; 
Radiologic Society of North America, Amer- 
ican Roentgen Ray Society, Philadelphia 
Medical Club, Aesculiapian Medical Club, 
Germantown Medical Club, Philadelphia 
Homeopathic Medical Society, Pennsylvania 
Homeopathic Medical Society, American 
Institute of Homeopathy, Medical Society of 
Eastern Delaware County, Roentgenologist to 
Hahnemann Hospital, Consulting Roentgen- 
ologist to St. Luke's and Children's Hospital. 



JOHN A. BORNEMAN. P.D. 

Professor of Pharmacy 

P.D., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. 
1902; Pi Upsilon Rho. 




FRANK C. BENSON. JR.. A.M.. M.D., 
F.A.C.S. 

Professor of Radiology 

M.D.. Hahnemann Medical College. 1894; 
A.M.. Hahnemann Medical College, 1925; 
F.A.C.S., 1922; Pi Upsilon Rho, Philadelphia 
County Medical Society, Pennsylvania State 
Medical Society, American Institute of 
Homeopathy. Pan-American Medical Asso- 
ciation, American College of Surgeons, Radi- 
ologist, Hahnemann Hospital. 





JOHN A. BROOKE. M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Head of the Department of Orthopedics 
Professor of Orthopedic Surgery 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1896; 
American College of Surgeons, Philadelphia 
Homeopathic Society, Pennsylvania Homeo- 
pathic Society, American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, American Medical Association, Amer- 
ican Academy of Orthopedic Surgery, Surgeon 
to Hahnemann Hospital, Chief of Orthopedic 
Department at Hahnemann Hospital, Chief of 
Orthopedic Department at St. Luke's and 
Children's Homeopathic Hospital, Chief of 
Orthopedic Department at Broad Street Hos- 
pital. Consultant of Orthopedic Department 
at West Jersey Homeopathic Hospital, Con- 
sultant of Orthopedic Department at Wil- 
mington Homeopathic Hospital. 




WILLIAM M. SYLVIS. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor of Anatomy 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1907; 
M.D., Jefferson Medical College, 1908; Phi 
Alpha Gamma, Philadelphia Homeopathic 
Medical Society, Pennsylvania Homeopathic 
Medical Society, American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, Pathological Society of Philadelphia, 
Associate Professor of Surgery, Associate 
in Surgical Pathology, Surgeon to Hahne- 
mann Hospital. 



THOMAS M. SNYDER, M.D. 

Professor of Histology and Embryology 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1916; Pi 
Upsilon Rho, Clinical Professor of Ophthal- 
mology, Assistant in Ophthalmological Path- 
ology, Ophthalmologist to Hahnemann Hos- 
pital. 




HENRY IRVIN KLOPP, 
Sc.D., M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Clinical Professor of Mental Diseases 

Palatinate (Albright) College. Sc.D., Muhl- 
enberg College, 1937; M.D., Hahnemann Med- 
ical College, 1894; Pi Upsilon Rho, Lehigh 
Valley Homeopathic Medical Society, Penn- 
sylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, Amer- 
ican Institute of Homeopathy, American Psy- 
chiatric Association, Philadelphia Psychiatric 
Association, American College of Physicians, 
Superintendent, Allentown State Hospital. 





JAMES H. MINES GODFREY. M.D. 

Professor of Anesthesia 

Professor of Anesthesia, M.D., Hahnemann 
Medical College, 1904; M.D., Jefferson Med- 
ical College, 1906; Alpha Sigma, State Homeo- 
pathic Medical Society, Philadelphia Homeo- 
pathic Medical Society, American Institute of 
Homeopathy. 




CHARLES B. HOLLIS. M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology 

Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology, 
M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1912; 
University of Vienna, Alpha Sigma, Medical 
Club of Philadelphia, Germantown Medical 
Society. American Institute of Homeopathy, 
Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medican Society, 
Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, 
American College of Surgeons, Laryngologist 
to Hahnemann Hospital, Consultant, Ear, 
Nose, and Throat, St. Luke's and Children's 
Hospital, Consultant in Nose and Throat, Al- 
lentown State Hospital, Consultant in Otol- 
ogy, Institute for Deaf, Trenton, N. J. 



J. F. McCLENDON, B.S. M.S.. Ph.D. 

Research Professor of Physiology 

B.S.. University of Texas, 1903 ; M.S., Uni- 
versity of Texas, 1904; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania, 1906; Phi Rho Sigma. Phi Beta 
Kappa, Sigma Xi. Fellow American Medical 
Association, Association for the Advancement 
of Science, Association for the Study of In- 
ternal Secretions. American Physiology So- 
ciety, Society of Experimental Biology and 
Medicine, American Society of Biological 
Chemists, Physiological Society of Philadel- 
phia, American Society of Anatomists, Amer- 
ican Chemical Society. Association of Military 
Surgeons, Biochemical Society of Great Brit- 
ain, International Goiter Conference, Inter- 
national Physiological Congress, Major, Of- 
ficers Reserve Corps, U. S. Army. 




JOSEPH SAMUEL HEPBURN, 

A.B., A.M., B.S. in Chem., M.S., Ph.D., M.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

A.B.. Central High School of Philadelphia. 
1903; A.M., Central High School of Philadel- 
phia, 1908; B.S., in Chem., University of Penn- 
sylvania, 1907; M.S., University of Pennsyl- 
vania, 1907; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1913; 
M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1934: Ed- 
ward Longstreet Medal of Merit of Franklin 
Institute, 1911; Pi Upsilon Rho. American In- 
stitute of Homeopathy (Honorary Associate 
Member), American Society of Biological 
Chemists. American Chemical Society. Penn- 
sylvania Chemical Society, Franklin Institute. 
Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia. 
Physiological Society of Philadelphia. Na- 
tional Gastroenterological Association, In 
Charge of Basal Metabolism, and Secretary 
of Staff, Women's Homeopathic Hospital, As- 
sociate in Gastrointestinal and Metabolic 
Diseases, Broad Street Hospital. 




■■^■^■^B 




DESIDERIO ROMAN. A.M.. M.D.. 
F.A.C.S. 

Clinical Professor of Surgery 

A.M.. National College of Granada, Nicar- 
agua, 1889; M.D.. Hahnemann Medical Col- 
lege. 1893; American College of Surgeons, 
Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, 
Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, 
American Institute of Homeopathy, Philadel- 
phia County Medical Society, Pennsylvania 
State Medical Society, American Medical As- 
sociation, Member of the Pan-American Med- 
ical Association, Germantown Medical So- 
ciety, Guest Lecturer, History of Medican, 
Sureogn-in-Chief to St. Luke's and Child- 
ren's Hospital, Consulting Surgeon to Wil- 
mington Homeopathic Hospital. 




JOSEPH McELDOWNEY, M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Medicine 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1905; 
Alpha Sigma, American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical 
Society, Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical 
Society, Clinical Professor of Physical Dia- 
gnosis, Physician to Hahnemann Hospital. 



BENJAMIN K. FLETCHER, Ph.G., M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Pediatrics 

Ph.G., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 
1888; M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1895: 
Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, 
Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, 
American Institute of Homeopathy, German- 
town Homeopathic Medical Society, Philadel- 
phia Pediatric Society, Physician to Children, 
Hahnemann Hospital. 




JAMES D. SCHOFIELD, M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Clinical Professor of Proctology 

M.D.. Hahnemann Medical College, 1902; 
Associate in Post-Graduate School, Univers- 
ity of Pennsylvania, Fellow American Proc- 
tologic Society, Proctologist, St. Luke's and 
Children's Homeopathic Hospital. Consulting 
Proctologist, Montgomery Hospital, Norris- 
town. Pa. 






DONALD R. FERGUSON. A.B., M.D., 
F.A.C.P. 

Clinical Professor of Medicine 

A.B., Swarthmore College, 1912; M.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College, 1916; Kappa 
Sigma, Alpha Sigma, American College of 
Physicians, American Institute of Homeo- 
pathy, Pennsylvania State Medical Society, 
Philadelphia County Medical Society, Ger- 
mantown Medical Society, Captain, Medical 
Corps, U S. Army, Electrocardiographer, As- 
sistant Visiting Physician to Hahnemann Hos- 
pital, Electrocardiographer to Women's 
Homeopathic Hospital, Cardiologist to Child- 
ren's and St. Luke's Hospital, Visiting Phy- 
sician to Broad Street Hospital. 



E. ROLAND SNADER. B.S., M.D.. 
F.A.C.P. 

Clinical Professor of Medicine 

B.S., Haverford College, 1917; M.D., Hahne- 
mann Medical College, Diplomate of Amer- 
ican Board of Internal Medicine, Fellow of 
the American College of Physicians, Alpha 
Sigma, Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical 
Society, Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical 
Society, American Institute of Homeopathy, 
Philadelphia County Medical Society, Penn- 
sylvania State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, Germantown Medical 
Society, Main Line Branch of Montgomery 
County Medical Society, Philadelphia Heart 
Association, Society for the Study of Internal 
Secretions, Philadelphia Metabolic Associa- 
tion, American Association of the History of 
Medicine, American Heart Association, Phy- 
sician to Hahnemann Hospital, Chief Meta- 
bolic Clinic Hahnemann Hospital, Consulting 
Physician to Allentown State Hospital, Con- 
sulting Physician to McKinley Memorial Hos- 
pital, Trenton, Consulting Physician to J. 
Lewis Crozer Hospital, Chester, Consulting 
Physician to Homeopathic Hospital of Ches- 
ter County, Chester. 



PAUL C. WITTMAN, M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College. 1916: 
American Institute of Homeopathy, County 
Homeopathic Society. State Homeopathic So- 
ciety, Dermatologist to Hahnemann Hospital, 
Dermatologist to Women's Homeopathic Hos- 
pital. 




EVERETT A. TYLER, Ph.B., M.D., 
F.A.C.A. 

Clinical Professor of Anesthesia 

Ph.B.. Syracuse University. 1910: M.D., 
Hahnemann Medical College, 1913; American 
Institute of Homeopathy, American Medical 
Association. Philadelphia County Medical 
Society. Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical 
Society. Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical 
Society, International Anesthesia Research 
Society. International Association of Anes- 
thetists. American Society of Anesthetists, 
Diplomate American Board of Anesthesiol- 
ogy, Alpha Sigma. Anesthetist to Hahne- 
mann Hospital, Chief. Department of Anes- 
thesia. St. Luke's and Children's Homeopathic 
Hospital. 




tmmamaa 




HENRY R. RUTH, B.S., M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Anesthesia 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1923; 
Alpha Sigma, Phi Sigma Kappa, Ptolemy, 
Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical Society, 
Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical Society, 
American Institute of Homeopathy, German- 
Medical Society, American Medical Associa- 
town Medical Society, Philadelphia County 
tion. Association of Anesthetists of U. S. and 
Canada, Anesthetist Travel Club of America, 
International Anesthetist Research Society, 
Eastern Society of Anesthetists (Past Presi- 
dent), American Society of Regional Anes- 
thesia, American Society of Anesthetists, 
American Society of Anesthetists, Inc. (Past 
President), Anesthetist to Hahnemann Hos- 
pital, Chief of Division of Anesthesia, Phila- 
delphia General Hospital, Chief Anesthetist 
to Broad Street Hospital, Anesthetist to St. 
uke's and Children's Hospital, Vice President 
of the American Board of Anesthesiology. 




NEWLIN F. PAXSON, B.S.. M.D.. 
F.A.C.S. 

Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 

M.D., Hahnemann Medical College, 1919; 
Alpha Sigma, Fellow American College of 
Surgeons, Philadelphia Homeopathic Medical 
Society, Pennsylvania Homeopathic Medical 
Society, American Institute of Homeopathy, 
Philadelphia County Medical Society, Penn- 
sylvania State Medical Society, American 
Medical Association, Philadelphia Obstetrical 
Society. Diplomate American Board Obstet- 
rics and Gynecology. 



GEORGE P. MILEY, B.A.. M.D. 

Clinical Professor of Pharmacology 

M.D., Northwestern University Medical 
School, 1932; Philadelphia Medical Society, 
Pennsylvania Medical Society, Fellow Amer- 
ican Medical Association, Member American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Philadelphia Physiological Society, National 
Society of Gastro-enterology, Director of New 
Hahnemann Research Foundation, Chief of 
Department of Hemo-irradiology, Acting 
Director of the Crystollography Laboratory, 
Hahnemann Hospital. 




AUBREY B. WEBSTER. A.B., M.D.. 
F.A.C.S. 

Clinical Professor of Surgery 

A.B., Acadia University, 1898; M.D., Boston 
University, 1902; Alpha Sigma, American 
College of Surgeons, Union League, German- 
town Club, Surgeon to Hahnemann Hospital, 
Surgeon to St. Luke's and Children's Homeo- 
pathic Hospital. 




NIGHT FALLS 



Night falls . . . 

To deepen the sorrows of the day. 

Still hours . . . 

Darken the weary souls of men. 

Pity Man . . . 

Who sleeps deaf to tortured cry. 

Scorn Man . . . 

Death must never have reward. 

Nor Pain . . . 

Its anguishing relentless way. 

Night falls . . . 

But Man does not forget Man. 

Still hours . . . 

Abound in Peace and loving Mercy. 

Man's humanity to man, 
One Mighty Barrier 
Against a vast Unknown. 




I N 



M 



MORI 



M 




LEON CLEMMER. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Professor and Head of Department of Obstetrics 
1888-1940 



HERBERT P. LEOPOLD. A.M.. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Clinical Professor of Surgery 
1874-1939 




WALLACE K. KRATZ 

Assistant Registrar 




r P HERE are times when the impersonal black of a printers ink 
■*■ set down in words, and phrases, and sentences on cold 
white paper must fall far short of the duties one would require 
of them. So it seems that anything that we, or anyone else 
who knows him, might set down on paper concerning Wally, 
would be wholly inadequate. To only enumerate the things 
we will remember him for: the ever-ready, cheerful smile; a 
wise crack that brightened up a hum-drum day, a word or two 
of consolation when we wallowed in the doldrums; a word of 
reassurance when rumors or actualities had us worried; a 
kindly word of counsel when we wrestled with a problem; and 
a friendly word of warning when we threatened to overstep 
any of the bounds which the exigencies of a medical curricula 
placed around us, to but enumerates these and all his other 
deeds which made our days at Hahnemann easier, could never 
serve to delineate the true character of the man. So, because 
there are none among us who do not owe some debt of grati- 
tude to him; and none among us whose medical school lives 
have not been enriched by his friendship, we salute — our friend 
and counsellor — 

"WALLY" 





ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

WILLIAM B. GRIGGS, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Therapeutics 
JOHN L. REDMAN, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Pediatrics 
O. F. BARTHMAIER, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Pathology 
DEACON STEINMETZ, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Surgery 
WILLIAM M. SYLVIS. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Surgery 
JOSEPH CHANDLER. A.B.. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
FRANK J. FROSCH, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Gynecology 
JAMES B. BERT. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Obstetrics 
HARRY F. HOFFMAN, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Mental Diseases 
JOSEPH R. CRISWELL, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Otology 
CARROLL F. HAINES. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Otology 
GEORGE LORENZ. JR.. B.S., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 
CHARLES J. V. FRIES, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology 
GEORGE D. GECKLER, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Medicine 
CHARLES J. WHITE. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Physical Diagnosis 
GRANT O. FAVORITE. B.S.. M.D.. F.A.C.P. 

Associate Professor of Pathology 
J. ANTRIM CRELLIN, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Medicine 
J. MILLER KENWORTHY. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Urology 
N. VOLNEY LUDWICK, B.S.. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Radiology 
JOHN J. McKENNA. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Roentgenology 
ALFRED E. KRICK, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Roentgenology 
H. RUSSELL FISHER. B.S., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Pathology 
LOWELL L. LANE. A.B.. M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Associate Professor of Medicine 
JAMES H. CLOSSON, B.S., M.D.. D.Sc. (Med) 

Associate Prof, of Neurology & Psychiatry 
CLARNCE L. SHOLLENBERGER, B.S., M.d", 

F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Anatomy 
ROWLAND RICKETTS, B.S., A.M., M.D., 

D.N.B. 

Associate Professor of Anatomy 
RUSSELL K. MATTERN. Ph.G, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Therapeutics 
ALBERT MUTCH, M.D. 

Associate Professor of Obstetrics 
HUNTER C. COOK. B.S.. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Pathology 
M. F. ASHLEY-MONTAGU. A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Anatomy 
CHARLES WILLIAM SCHAFFER A.B.. B.S., 

M.Sc Ph.C. 

Associate Professor of Pharmacology 
LESTER L. BOWER. M.D. 

Associate Professor of Gastro-Enterology 



THOMAS L. DOYLE, M.D., M.R.C.S., Eng., 

F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Surgery 
WILLIAM L MARTIN, B.S., M.D. 

Associate Professor of Surgery 
EVERETT H. DICKINSON, M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Surgery 
HENRY L. CROWTHER. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Associate Professor of Obstetrics 
CHARLES L. W. RIEGER, M.D. 

Associate in Roentgenology 
JOHN H. READING JR., M.D. 

Associate in Pediatrics 
GEORGE R. NEFF, M.D. 

Associate in Nervous Diseases 
WILLIAM M. SYLVIS. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Associate in Surgical Pathology 
WM. J. RYAN. M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
MARION W. BENJAMIN, M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
H. FRANKLIN FLANAGAN, A.B., B.S.. M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
CARROLL R. McCLURE. M.D. 

Associate in Histology and Embryology 
HARRY S. WEAVER. JR.. M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
CARL C. FISCHER. B.S., A.M.. M.D., F.A.A.P., 

F.A.C.P. 

Associate in Pediatrics 
JOHN S. MILLER, JR., M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
PAUL A. METZGER, M.D. 

Associate in Neurology and Psychiatry 
WALTER J. SNYDER. M.D. 

Associate in Gastro-Enterology 
JAMES F. TOMPKINS. M.D. 

Associate in Gastro-Enterology 
JOSEPH S. HEPBURN. A.B., A.M., B.S. in 

Chem.. M.S.. Ph.D.. MD 

Research Associate in Gastro-Enterology 
JOHN H. McCUTCHEON, M.D. 

Associate in Laryngology and Rhinology 
RAYMOND McGRATH, M.D. 

Associate in Larynology and Rhinology 
RUSSELL D. GEARY, M.D. 

Associate in Larynology and Rhinology 
WILLIAM K. KISTLER. M.D.. M.Sec. (Med.) 

Associate in Bronchoscopy 
RUSSELL S. MAGEE. A.B.. B.S.. M.D.. D.N.B. 

Associate in Therapeutics 
H. WASTL. M.D. 

Research Associate in Anatomy 
EHRENFRIED PFEIFFER. Ch.E.. M.D. 

Research Associate in Chemistry 
JOSEPH W. MESSEY. Ph.G.. M.D. 

Associate in Pharmacology 
RAYMOND E. SEIDEL. M.D. 

Associate in Pharmacology 
DESIDERIO A. ROMAN. M.D. 

Associate in Obstetrics 
RICHARD R. GATES. A.B., M.D. 

Associate in Obstetrics 
HENRY D. LAFFERTY. B.S., M.D. 

Associate in Obstetrics 
HARRY P. LANDIS. JR.. M.D. 

Associate in Histology and Embriology 
WILLIAM S. SUTHERLAND. M.D. 

Associate in Ophthalmology 
ISADORE J. WESSEL. M.D. 

Associate in Gastro-Enterology 



THE FACULTY 



LECTURERS 

NATHAN GRIFFITH, LL.B. 

Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence 
WILLIAM F. BAKER, A.M., M.D. 

Lecturer on Non-Pharmacal Therapeutics 
DAVID W. HORN, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Lecturer on Hygiene 
RICHARD W. LARER. M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Lecturer on Medical Economics 
CLARENCE L. SHOLLENBERGER, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 

Lecturer on Surgery 
WM. G. SCHMIDT, Ph.D. 

Lecturer on Bio-Physics and Physical 
Chemistry 
EDWIN O. GECKLER, M.D.. F.A.C.S. 

Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery 
FRANK E. BRISTOL. M.D. 

Lecturer on Surgery 
DUNNE W. KIRBY, B.S., M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
MORRIS FITERMAN, M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
CHARLES F. KUTTEROFF, Ph.C, M.D. 

Lecturer on Gynecology 
L. THOMAS SOOY, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Neurology and Psychiatry 
THOMAS J. VISCHER, M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
MELVILLE A. GOLDSMITH, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
GEORGE D. GECKLER, M.D. 

Lecturer on Physiology 
ALBERT V. HALLOWELL. M.D. 

Lecturer on Laryngology and Rhinology 
PAUL C. MOOCK, M.D. 

Lecturer on Obstetrics 
MICHELE VIGLIONE, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
CHARLES E. LAWSON, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Medicine 
JULES J. KLAIN, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Physio-Therapy 
EDWARD W. CAMPBELL, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Lecturer on Urology 
EUGENE F. CARPENTER, JR., M.D. 

Lecturer on Surgery 
THEODORE C. GEARY, B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Surgery 
DONALD T. JONES. M.D. 

Lecturer on Orthopedic Surgery 
WILLIAM G. WOSNACK, M.D. 

Lecturer on Obstetrics 
H. FRANKLIN FLANAGAN, A.B., B.S., M.D. 

Lecturer on Physiology 
PASQUALE G. DAMIANI, M.D. 

Lecturer on Urology 
WILLIAM C. HUNSICKER, JR., B.S., M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 

Lecturer on Urology 



BRUCE V. MacFAYDEN, B.S., M.D., M.Sc. 

(Med.) 

Demonstrator of Gynecology 
SAMUEL ALLEN DINGEE, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Gastro-Enterology 
GERALD P. FINCKE, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Medicine 
WILLIAM A. WEAVER, JR., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Laryngology & Rhinology 
HARRY D. EVANS, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Roentgenology 
HARRY P. LANDIS, JR., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Therapeutics 
PAUL M. KISTLER, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Pediatrics 
CHAS. F. LEONARD, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Urology 
BERNARD G. WALKER, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Urology 
WILLIAM KLINMAN, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Medicine 
HERBERT M. SHARKIS, A.B., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Medicine 
WARREN H. HOENSTINE, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Medicine 
HENRY J. KOHLER, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Otology 
WILLIAM M. SNOWDEN, B.S., M.D. 

Demonstrator of Therapeutics 
WILLIAM P. GREGG. M.D. 

Demonstrator of Pediatrics 
HORST A. AGERTY, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Pediatrics 
LEANDER P. TORI, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Urology 
HENRY G. BLESSING, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Urology 
HORACE L. WEINSTOCK, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Urology 



DEMONSTRATORS 

J. CARL CRISWELL, D.D.S. 

Demonstrator of Dental Surgery 
ROBERT A. HIBBS, M.D. 

Demonstrator of Pediatrics 
HARRY B. MARK, M.D., F.A.A.P. 

Demonstrator of Pediatrics 
EDMUND G. HESSERT, B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology 



INSTRUCTORS 

N. FULMER HOFFMAN. M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
EDWIN HICKS, B.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
THOMAS M. SNYDER, M.D. 

Instructor in Ophthalmological Pathology 
GEORGE J. RILLING, C.S., M.D. 

Instructor in Proctology 
ALBERT R. RIHL, JR., M.D. 

Instructor in Obstetrics 
HIRAM FRANCIS SNIDER, B.S., M.S. 

Instructor in Chemistry 
WILLIAM Y. LEE, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
JAMES A. SELIGMAN, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
CHARLES C. THOMPSON, M.D. 

Instructor in Proctology 
EDWARD P. VAN TINE. A.B., M.D. 

Instructor in Anesthesia 
HENRY D. LAFFERTY, B.S., M.D. 

Instructor in Gynecological Pathology 
EVERETT H. DICKINSON, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Instructor in Surgical Pathology 
MAXWELL F. WHITE, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
JOHN F. ROWLAND, M.D. 

Instructor in Anesthesia 
DAVID D. NORTHROP, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 



ERNEST L. ROSATO, Ph.G.. M.D. 

Instructor in Proctology 
EDGAR M. BLEW, M.D. 

Instructor in Mental Diseases 
WALTER E. KEPLER. B.S., M.D. 

Instructor in Roentgenology 
FRANCIS M. JAMES, M.D. 

Instructor in Physiology 
FREDERICK W. JARVIS, M.D. 

Instructor in Pediatrics 
FRANK H. MURRAY, M.D. 

Instructor in Proctology 
WILLIAM A. BUCK, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
RAYMON C. MOYER. M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
M. FREDERICK ONDOVCHAK, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
JOHN J. DOMANSKI. M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
LEOPOLD S. LIPSITZ. M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
H. EARLE TWINING. A.B., M.D. 

Instructor in Dermatology 
J. RAWLINS GINTHER, A.B., M.D. 

Instructor in Dermatology 
J. ARTHUR HORNEFF. M.D. 

Instructor in Pathology 
ROBERT J. McNEILL, JR., M.D. 

Instructor in Obstetrics 
ALBERT R. SERAPHIN. M.D. 

Instructor in Gynecology 

B. MARVIN HAND. M.D. 

Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry 
CHARLES S. FOX. A.B., M.D. 

Instructor in Neurology and Psychiatry 
WILLIAM J. KUEMMEL. A.B.. M.D. 

Instructor in Anatomy 
WILLIAM Y. LEE. M.D. 

Instructor in Anatomy 
JACOB H. SIGAFOOS, M.D. 

Instructor in Anesthesia 
RUSSELL C. SMITH. M.D. 

Instructor in Anesthesia 
HERMAN KLINE. M.D. 

Instructor in Dermatology 
JACOB H. LEHMAN, M.D. 

Instructor in Roentgenology 
ROBERT M. HUNTER. M.D. 

Instructor in Obstetrics 
E. DALLET SHARPLESS, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgerv 
HERMAN J. LUBOWITZ, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 
LYLE V. BECK. A.B.. M.S., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Physiology 
HERBERT S. WARREN. A.M., B.S., Ph.D. 

Instructor in Anatomy 
JOHN H. DAVIE. M.D. 

Instructor in Medicine 
J. PAUL BURKETT. M.D. 

Instructor in Medicine 

C. J. KLEINGUENTHER. M.D. 
Instructor in Dermatology 

OSCAR GRIGGS. M.D. 

Instructor in Obstetrics 
RUSSELL S. MAGEE. A.B.. B.S.. M.D.. D.N.B. 

Instructor in Medicine 
WILLIAM C. THOROUGHGOOD, M.D. 

Instructor in Surgery 



ASSISTANTS 

THEODORE W. BATTAFARANO, M.D. 

Assistant in Physiology 
PETER J. WARTER, M.D. 

Assistant in Medicine 
WILLIAM J. WALKER, M.D. 

Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 
RUSSELL C. SMITH, M.D. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology 
E. DALLET SHARPLESS, M.D. 

Assistant in Histology and Embryology 
LEON A. FRANKEL. M.D. 

Assistant in Anatomy 
OSCAR E. HEIM, M.D. 

Assistant in Anatomy 
NUBAR A. KARAKASHIAN, M.D. 

Assistant in Anatomv 
GEORGE P. GLENN, M.D. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology 
NUBAR A. KARAKASHIAN. M.D. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology 
LIVINGSTON CHUNN, M.D. 

Assistant in Anatomy 
ARTHUR W. W. WADDINGTON. M.D. 

Assistant in Gynecology 
ARTHUR A. HARTLEY, M.D. 

Assistant in Gynecology 
WILLIAM S. SILVERMAN. M.D. 

Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 
JOHN B. CONWELL, M.D. 

Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 
ALFONSO L. PIERRO. M.D. 

Assistant in Gastro-Enterology 
W. VERNON HOSTELLEY, M.D. 

Assistant in Larynogology and Rhinology 
PAUL M. JAMES. M.D. 

Assistant in Obstetrics 
HARRY D. EVANS, JR., M.D. 

Assistant in Obstetrics 
FRANCIS M. JAMES. M.D. 

Assistant in Obstetrics 
MARTIN PACKMAN. M.D. 

Assistant in Pediatrics 
ROMAINE C. HOFFMAN, M.D. 

Assistant in Medicine 
EMANUEL ALMES, M.D. 

Assistant in Therapeutics 
FRANCIS B. SMYTH, M.D. 

Assistant in Gynecology 
PASQUALE J. C. GAMBESCIA. M.D. 

Assistant in Pediatrics 
ALFRED SEBASTIAN DAMIANI. M.D. 

Assistant in Obstetrics 
WILLIAM ELLIS. M.D. 

Assistant in Urology 





MISS CLARA C. FISHER, B. A. 
Secretary to the Dean 



MRS. MELLITA TURNER 
Librarian 







••-> 



I 




m 




III 



TO OUR PARENTS 



On this, the first page of the Senior Section, we pause to pay 
tribute to two grand people. 

Through long years they have inspired our every effort to 
strive on. Their sacrifices have been great, indeed, that our 
names should appear on the pages that follow. 

Whether it be our fare to achieve distinction or not in our 
chosen profession, may we strive always to vindicate their pro- 
found faith in us. 

And in after years, when we turn the pages of this book, may 
this serve, always, as a reminder of the two whose devotion has 
made us physicians — 

MOTHER AND DAD. 




lyvNjioMp rhi (.physician ami 
. l-scu hjiu&K PtalthA All'hcalSall ihdgodj*^ ecdck ><*cj 
liut auoittoio 10 my ability K ludoojnont^ <i<±> 

^ -e^I>nx KEEP THIS Oth 

^^this .Kiiinihcion-to rtrkou him who uttghl me this. \\^ 
ot|iwIIydcar tblni' .is myjwrenr."* to share my sunsc.iueiN, 
wiih him c "irluvc his nei csmius ihiipredto look upon 
us offspring "i'ho ^itTio looiino .isniv < wn lwthersAio t«ich ihetn this Art 
if ihev shall Vj'sh to learn it ^^^^r^> egg-- ^^^ > 

f ^>I TfSV T^EE OR 5W 1 A 1 1 OX 

Qtfar ft precgrr, (ertutr.Qctcty \jptfhr moar o> insnvcnon / 
vtulmvari aJtiteuicUiic >_<y rj>e\ //■/ tow own so.'ts {p tfosegfl ny 
" micoers <$n(c1Tstim-s pcuna"n' a 'stimulation &~l>$?i> 

_ TiCCOKpiNG TOTHU3WOF MeBioKTv 
hit to none others JuiU *fiffou> j/r srstcm % of- ivyimcn^jtilzck^ 
acccTiWW ti m\ rt/>ilif}' fe mdacment I consider ' 

FOF.THE3ENEFIT OF^ P?ffIENTvS 

Cakhun Jn -m uhuctrr is drfrtmew V ' msom vous. J mil //tie . 
no aeaql^incqjcinc to -un^ one J/ "asKcdnor sj/aptst '4gy such 
mtitpeOom Uk< manner 1 will wtaivejc a ioomm a pessary tirproauce 

' a Ji r ™ wm^-r^ r fe^mhoi] { ^Ess twin. 
PA§pqiLiFE, 8 pRacticf MyJ^x-^ 

/vuinrtcut xrsons laforinf under tk\ stone .Jut J filf]eatv tksto be 
Stetymtn wo are rra'ctmenep o/\thiswcrkJnt(\u'thitevcr^ bouses 
I enter, hilljv into tnm hrt/xf>encii}o/ r ti\' srck\ l wilt aostam /mm 
etm mttn/w' actjfjtmintffrcen$uon ^y.\'n 7\7^/7//:R 
. dm tih'semnon jtfjmaus or males, of firemen H^Ts/ams- ■ '^~- 
~JI'/\vcvcr n: connection utth my mx^ionaC 
pweqcejrnoj ' m connection wtjlni /sec or /.ran 
in incnjc fm v w/ticn ougtu not to Pc spoken 

oj^vei^WE^VT^l\ r 0^L 

\< itvkonuw rim aTTJiifh should lv kqn scaw 
^'lule tt'oiHiniic to ktfp iln.s Oath unvioLiroc' 
in.iv ii be crarto^touictoi'ujo)' lilt a the pmctlec 
or the An nesivctedlyall men m all times! 
Hut should 1 trespass Inviolate this Oath 
may tlierxwrtt* lx" my lot! 



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UL 




UL 



ARMAND F. VERGA 

President 




HUGH J. BURNS 

Vice-President 



LEON M. CARP 

Secretary 



FRANCISCO 
BERIO-SUAREZ RUSSEL P. STONER 

Treasurer Student Institute 




JOHN H. ABBOTT 
Allentown, Penna. 

Lehigh University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Pi Upsilon Rho, Ptolemy 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphai, Pa. 




EDWARD A. ABERANT 
Wyoming, Penna. 

Pennsylvania State College 
Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club 

Wyoming Valley Homeopathic 
Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 






MILTON ACKERMAN 
New York City, New York 

University of Pittsburgh 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Delta Epsilon; Glee Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic 
Society; Medic 1, 2, 3, Editor-in- 
Chief 4. 

Montefiore Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 




VINCENT F. AMAR 
Rockland, New York 

University of Alabama 
Bachelor of Arts 

St. John's Riverside Hospital 
Yonkers, New York 




— ■— ■— i 






R. JOHN AMATO 
Newark, New Jersey 

University of South Carolina 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu (President) 4. 

St. James Hospital 
Newark, New Jersey 




L. ARSUAGA ROURE 
Miramar. Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Newman Club 1, 2. 

Fajardo District Hospital 
Fajardo, Puerto Rico 



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V. GILBERT BEGENAU 
Peekskill, New York 

Syracuse University 
University of Alabama 

Student Institute 1, 2. 

East Orange General Hospital 
East Orange, New Jersey 





CHARLES C. BENEDETTI 
Lynn, Massachusetts 

Tufts College 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu; Newman Club. 

Union Hospital of Fall River 
Fall River, Massachusetts 



ERNEST J. BENKO 
Portage, Penna. 

Carnegie Institute of Technology 

Medic 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




FRANCISCO BERIO-SUAREZ 
Corozal, Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 
Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club; Class Treasurer 4. 

Captal City Hospitals 
Santurce, Puerto Rico 






JOSEPH JOHN BOBECK 
Hudson, Penna. 

University of Scranton 
Bachelor of Science 

Pi Upsilon Rho; Newman Club. 

Wyoming Valley Homeopathic 
Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 




CHARLES EDGAR BOLINGER 
Greenville, Penna. 

Thiel College 
Bachelor of Science 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



= 



FRANXLIN A. BONTEMPO 
Aliquippa. Penna. 

Washington and Jefferson College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Club "19"; Glee 
Club 1; Basketball 4. 

St. Francis Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 




WILLIAM P. BRADLEY. JR. 
Coraopolis, Penna. 

Waynesburg College 
Bachelor of Science 

Medic 4. 

St. Joseph's Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 





CARL F. BUECHLE 
Irvington, New Jersey 

Albright College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Club "19"; 
Medic 4. 

East Orange General Hospital 
East Orange, New Jersey 





HUGH JOSEPH BURNS 
McKeesport, Penna. 

Duquesne University 
Bachelor of Science 

Alpha Sigma; VanLennep Surgical 
Society; Club "19"; Class Vice- 
President 4. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 



— 



^■^^ 



ANGEL ROBERTO BUXEDA 
Santurce, Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Newman Club. 

Presbyterian Hospital 
Santurce, Puerto Rico 




HENRY HUGH CANTON 
Watervliet, New York 

Fordham University 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpa Gamma; Newman Club; 
Club "19"; Basketball 1, 2, 3; Coach 



Fitkin Memorial Hospital 
Neptune, New Jersey 









LEON M. CARP 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Lambda Kappa; Class Secre- 
tary 4. 

Montgomery Hospital 
Norristown, Penna. 




RALPH DEAN J. CAVALLI 
Wilmington, Delaware 

University of Delaware 
Mount St. Mary's College 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu; Newman Club. 

West Jersey Homeopathic Hospital 
Camden. New Jersey 




LOUIS ANTHONY CERULLI 
Rochester, New York 

Louisiana State University 
University of Alabama 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu; Newman Club 1; 
Managing Editor, Medic 4; Class 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, 4. 

St. Mary's Hospital 
Rochester, New York 




PETER JOHN CETTA 
Brooklyn, New York 

Long Island University 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu 

St. Peter's HospitH. 
Brooklyn, New York 











AUGUST ANTHONY CIOTOLA 
Hazleton, Penna. 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu. 

Nesbitt Memorial Hospital 
Kingston, Penna. 





WILLIAM RYCROFT CLARKSON 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

Princeton University 

Phi Alpha Gamma (President) 4; 
VanLennep Surgical Society; Un- 
dergraduate Society. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 



= 



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WILLIAM T. COREY 
Munhall, Penna. 

University of Pittsburgh 
Bachelor of Science 

Medic 4. 

St. Joseph's Hospital 
Pitsburgh, Penna. 




JOSEPH TERRAZZINO CORTESE 
Newark, New Jersey 

Upsala College 
Maryville College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu. 

Memorial Hospital 
Newark, New Jersey 








THOMAS R. COUNIHAN 
Forest Hills, New York 

Fordham University 
Bachelor of Science 

Medic 4. 

Fifth Avenue and Flower Hospitals 
New York City, New York 





RAYMOND W. CRONLUND 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Gettysburg College 
Bachelor of Science 

Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic 
Society; VanLennep Surgical So- 
ciety. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



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RICHARD IRWIN DARNELL 
Easton, Penna. 

Lafayette College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Undergraduate Society; Garth W. 
Boericke Therapeutic Society (Presi- 
dent) 4; Glee Club (Director) 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Pa. 




JOSEPH ANTHONY DE CARO 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

St. Joseph's College 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu; Newman Club 1, 
2, 3; II Circolo Italiano. 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





STEPHEN DERKACH 
Nanticoke, Penna. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
University of Pennsylvania 
Graduate in Pharmacy 

Undergraduate Society. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





REUBEN JAMES DIERWECHTER 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Villanova College 
Bachelor of Science 

Pi Upsilon Rho; VanLennep Surg- 
ical Society; Newman Club; Photo- 
graphy Editor Medic 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





ERNANI V. M. DI MASSA 
Philadelphia. Penna. 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu; II Circolo Italiano; 
Newman Club. 

St. Mary's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




JOSEPH WILSON EHRHART 
Forty Fort, Penna. 

Wyoming Seminary 
Albright College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Reimann On- 
cologic Society (President) 4; Glee 
Club 4; Class Baseball. 

Nesbitt Memorial Hospital 
Kingston, Penna. 






HAROLD ELCANESS 
New York City, New York 

College of the City of New York 
Bachelor of Science 

Wilmington Homeopathic Hospital 
Wilmington, Delaware 




GEORGE ERWIN ENGELHARD 
Arlington, New Jersey 

University of Virginia 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma. 

East Orange General Hospital 
East Orange, New Jersey 



ROWLAND BURTON ENGLE 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Dickinson College 
Bachelor of Science 

Class Secretary 3; Secretary Stu- 
dent Council 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




KENNETH duBOIS ERVIN 
Jenkintown, Penna. 

Princeton University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Alpha Gamma, VanLennep 
Surgical Society; Undergraduate 
Society (President); Class President 
1; Blue and Gold Committee 4; 
Student Council 1. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 






HAROLD H. EVANS 
Berwick, Penna. 

New York University 
Bucknell University 
Bachelor of Science 

Undergraduate Society; Club "19"; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Treas- 
urer 1; Student Council 3. 

Harrisburg Hospital 
Harrisburg, Penna. 




RUSSELL M. EVANS. JR. 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

University of Pittsburgh 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Undergraduate 
Society; Club "19"; Class Secre- 
tary 1. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 




j^-'-¥4SS7-'-a<v'a^jiifiSS 



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JOSEPH MARTIN FASO 
Portland, New York 

Miami University (Ohio) 
Bachelor of Arts 

Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic So- 
ciety; Reimann Oncologic Society; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Vice 
President 1; Blue and Gold Com- 
mittee 4. 

Hamot Hospital 
Erie, Penna. 




PATTISON FULTON 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

University of Wisconsin 

Undergraduate Society; Basket- 
ball 1. 

Bethesda Hospital 
Cincinnati, Ohio 






LEON GLASSMAN 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Delta Epsilon (President) 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




HERBERT K. GOFF 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

University of Pittsburgh 
Bachelor of Science 

Pi Upsilon Rho; VanLennep Surg- 
ical Society; Garth W. Boericke 
Therapeutic Society; Undergrad- 
uate Society; Medic 4. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 



MAURICE B. GORDON 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Lambda Kappa (President) 4; 
VanLennep Surgical Society. 

Atlantic City Hospital 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 




EVERARDO GOYANES 
Brooklyn, New York 

Colgate University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Alpha Gamma, Garth W. 
Boericke Therapeutic Society; Van 
Lennep Surgical Society, Under- 
graduate Society; Blue and Gold 
Committee 1, 2, 3, 4; Medic 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 









LESTER S. GREIDER 
Dauphin, Penna. 

Susquehanna University 

Harrisburg Hospital 
Harrisburg, Penna. 




CYRIL VOGEL GROSS 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

University of Michigan 
Bachelor of Arts 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



WILLIAM LIONEL GRUBER 
Newark, New Jersey 

Rutgers University College of 
Pharmacy 

Upsala College 
New York University 
Columbia University 
Graduate in Pharmacy 
Bachelor of Arts 

Newark Beth Israel Hospital 
Newark, New Jersey 




HOWARD L. HAIN 
Elizabethtown, Penna. 

Catowba College 

Franklin and Marshall College 

Bachelor of Science 

Harrisburg Polyclinic Hospital 
Harrisburg, Penna. 






STEVEN HAMMERMAN 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Columbia University- 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Lambda Kappa. 

Coney Island City Hospital 
Brooklyn, New York 




GEORGE WOOD HARRISON 
Ashland, Wisconsin 

University of Notre Dame 
Bachelor of Science 

St. Mary's Hospital 
Superior, Wisconsin 



■ 



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M 



HAROLD W. HENDRICKSON 
Camden, New Jersey 

University of Pennsylvania 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




PAUL JAMES HERLEY 
Coatesville, Penna. 

Villanova College 
University of Pennsylvania 

Newman Club; Reimann Oncologic 
Society; Medic 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 












C. RICHARD HOLLAND 
Rochester, Minnesota 

Rochester Junior College 

Swedish Hospital 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 




J. SCHOFIELD HOPPING 
Hanover, New Jersey 

Louisiana State University 

Alpha Sigma. 

Newark City Hospital 
Newark, New Jersey 



I 




J 



CHARLES W. HOYT 
Hillsboro, Ohio 

Ohio Wesleyan University 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Undergraduate 
Society; Medic 4. 

Bethesda Hospital 
Cincinnati, Ohio 




FREDERICK WILLIAM HUMMEL 
West Belmar, New Jersey 

Princeton University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Class President 2. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





ALLEN ROBERT KANNAPEL 
Palmerton, Penna. 

Pennsylvania State College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; VanLennep 
Surgical Society. 

Allentown General Hospital 
Allentown, Penna. 





PETER PAUL KARPAWICH 
Worcester, Massachusetts 

Holy Cross College 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Clinico-Pathologic Society; Class 
Treasurer 1, 2, 3; Student Institute 
Treasurer 4; Blue and Gold Com- 
mittee 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

Worcester Memorial Hospital 
Worcester, Massachusetts 



MARTIN D. KISSEN 
Philadelphia, Psnna. 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Delta Epsilon; Garth W. Boer- 
icke Therapeutic Society; Glee 
Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Blue and Gold Com- 
mittee 3, 4; Class Dance Committee 
1, 2, 3; Editor Class Newspaper 
1, 2. 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




LAWRENCE JAY KOPF 
New York City. N. Y. 

Johns Hopkins University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Delta Epsilon; Garth W. Boer- 
icke Therapeutic Society; Reimann 
Oncologic Society; Medic 4. 

Allentown General Hospital 
Allentown, Penna. 






JACOB KRAUSE 
Norristown, Penna. 

Temple University 
Ursinus College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Lambda Kappa; Glee Club 1, 
2, 3, 4. 

Montgomery Hospital 
Norristown, Penna. 




RICHARD E. LANG 
Passaic. New Jersey 

Holy Cross College 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Reimann On- 
cologic Society; Clinico-Pathologic 
Society. 

St. Mary's Hospital 
Passaic, New Jersey 




' Tv-'TWJSRBB! 9 






HUGH JAMES LENAHAN. JR. 
West Pittston, Penna. 

Georgetown University 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




RALPH JOSEPH LENOCI 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 

Fordham University 
Bachelor of Science 

Bridgeport General Hospital 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 






BERNARD FRANCIS LEONARD 
Burlington, New Jersey 

Drexel Institute 

St. Joseph's College 

Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club 1; Blue and Gold 
Committee 4; Basketball 1, 2. 

Wilmington Homeopathic Hospital 
Wilmington, Delaware 




CARL A. LEYRER 
Hamilton, Ohio 

Miami University (Ohio) 

Phi Alpha Gamma, Garth W. Boer- 
icke Therapeutic Society; Club 
"19"; VanLennep Surgical Society; 
Class Vice President 2; Glee Club 
1, 2, 3, Manager 4; Blue and Gold 
Committee 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3, 
Captain 4. 

Bethesda Hospital 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



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BENJAMIN NORMAN LITMAN 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

St. Joseph's College 
University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Lambda Kappa; Basketball 3. 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




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JOHN MARTIN LOFTUS 
Scranton, Penna. 

University of Scranton 
Bachelor of Science 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 






JACOB SNYDER LUDWIG 
Coatesville, Penna. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
and Science 

Franklin and Marshall College 
Graduate in Pharmacy 

VanLennep Surgical Society; Medic 
4. 

York Hospital 
York, Penna. 




ROBERT B. MARIN 

New Rochelle, New York 

Lafayette College 
Columbia University 
Bachelor of Science 

Elue and Gold Committee 4. 

Wilmington Homeopathic Hospital 
Wilmington, Delaware 



™»-*s= 



i ES9I 

— — 



GERARD FRANCIS McDONOUGH 
Manchester, New Hampshire 

Georgetown University 
Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club 1, 2. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




EUGENE GEORGE MELLIES 
St. Louis, Missouri 

St. Louis University 

Pi Upsilon Rho (President) 4; Ptol- 
emy Society; Undergraduate So- 
ciey; Medic 4. 

Christian Hospital 
St. Louis, Missouri 





DAVID MELTZER 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Delta Epsilon. 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





ANTON LAWRENCE MERKLIN 
St. Louis, Missouri 

St. Louis University 

Pi Upsilon Rho. 

St. Louis City Hospital 
St. Louis, Missouri 




JOHN L. MEYERS 
Shillington, Penna. 

Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
and Science 
Albright College 

Reimann Oncologic Society; Clin- 
ico-Pathologic Society; Medic 4. 

Homeopathic Medical and Surgical 
Hospital, Reading, Penna. 




JOHN JOSEPH MILICI 
New Haven, Connecticut 

Fordham Universtiy 
Loyola College 
Bachelor of Science 

Grace Hospital 

New Haven, Connecticut 








PAUL T. MILNAMOW 
Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 

Villanova College 
Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club 1, 2. 

Mercy Hospital 
Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 





ANTHONY J. MINELLI 
Elkhart, Indiana 

Lambda Phi Mu. 

Huron Road Hospital 
Cleveland, Ohio 



_ 



FRANK DOMINICK MINERVA 
Brooklyn, New York 

University of Alabama 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu, Newman Club 1; 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Medic 4. 

Frankford Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




EDWARD W. MULLIGAN 
Red Bank, New Jersey 

Gettysburg College 
Bachelor of Science 

Medic 4. 

St. Peter's General Hospital 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 






-~ 




WALLACE WELSH MUNSIE 
Decatur, Illinois 

James Millikin University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Basketball 1, 2; Medic 4. 

Huion Road Hospital 
Cleveland, Ohio 




JAMES V. MURPHY 
Lockpori, New York 

Manhattan College 
University of Buffalo 
Bachelor of Science 
Master of Arts 

Flushing Hospital 
Flushing, New York 






■I 



FRANKLIN K. NELK 
Hazleton, Penna. 

University of Pennsylvania 
Columbia University 
Franklin and Marshall 
Bachelor of Science 

Alpha Sigma; Medic, Advertising 
Manager 4. 

Pottsville Hospital 
Pottsville, Penna. 




SAMUEL OLLER 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 
Bachelor of Arts 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 






J. ALBERT F. PARKER 
Wilmington, Delaware 

University of Delaware 

Newman Club 1, 2; Medic 4. 

East Orange General Hospital 
East Orange, New Jersey 




JOSEPH J. PENDOLA 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Brooklyn College 
St. John's University 
Bachelor of Science 

Newman Club; Medic 4. 

Mercy Hospital 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



DOMINIC JOSEPH PONTARELLI 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 

Lambda Phi Mu; II Circolo Italiano; 
Class Vice President 3; Hahnemann 
Institute; Garth W. Boericke Thera- 
peutic Society; Newman Club. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




LEE PULLEN 
Freehold, New Jersey 

Franklin and Marshall 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; VanLennep 
Surgical Society (President) 3, 4. 

Homeopathic Medical and Surgical 
Hospital, Reading, Penna. 





SAMUEL J. PUMA. JR. 
Pittston, Penna. 

Gettysburg College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Lambda Phi Mu; Clinico-Pathologic 
Society; Blue and Gold Commit- 
tee 4. 

Mercy Hospital 
Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 






STANLEY PUPEK, JR. 
Conshohocken, Penna. 

Villanova College 

Homeopathic Medical and Surgical 
Hospital, Reading, Penna. 




I 



KENNETH RAMIREZ-SMITH 
Aquadilla, Puerto Rico 

College of Agriculture and Mech- 
anical Arts 
University of Puerto Rico 

Bayamon District Hospital 
Bayamon, Puerto Rico 




JULES A. RIEHS 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

LaSalle College 

Newman Club 1,2; Blue and Gold 
3, 4. 

St. Mary's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





CARLOS F. RIVERA-LUGO 
Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 
Bachelor of Science 
Certificate of Social Work 

Newman Club 1, 2; Garth W. Boer- 
icke Therapeutic Society. 

Wilmington Homeopathic Hospital 
Wilmington, Delaware 





JAMES A. R. ROGERS 
Paterson, New Jersey 

Muhlenberg College 
Bachelor of Science 

Undergraduate Society, Garth W. 
Boericke Therapeutic Society; Van 
Lennep Surgical Society; Medic. 

St. Michael's Hospital 
Newark, New Jersey 



WILLIAM H. ROGERS 
Spring City, Penna. 

Muhlenberg College 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 




D. O. ROJAS-DAPORTA 
San German, Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

VanLennep Surgical Society. 

Bayamon District Hospital 
Bayamon, Puerto Rico 






ULISES LOPEZ SANABRIA 
San German, Puerto Rico 

Polytechnic Instiute of Puerto Rico 
Bachelor of Arts 

Bayamon District Hospital 
Bayamon, Puerto Rico 




DAVID B. SCANLAN 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 

Villanova College 
Bachelor of Science 

VanLennep Surgical Society; 
Medic 4. 

Atlantic City Hospital 
Atlantic City, New Jersey 




NATHAN SCHARF 
Spring Valley, New York 

Cornell University 
Bachelor of Science 

Metropolitan Hospital 
New York City, New York 




PHILIP ALBERT SCHIFALACQUA 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 
Bachelor of Science 

II Circolo Italiano (President) 4; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Medic 4. 

St. Luke's and Children's Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





JOSEPH ALFRED SCIUTO 
Lawrence, Massachusetts 

V:llcnova College 
Bachelor of Science 

II Circolo Italiano; Newman Club 
1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2; Blue and Gold 
4. 

St. Luke's Hospital 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 





FRANK A. SERENA 
Norwalk, Connecticut 

Columbia University 

Medic 4. 

Providence Homeopathic Hospital 
Providence, Rhode Island 





■■■ 



n 



WILLIAM JOSEPH SHAUGHNESSY 
Worcester, Massachusetts 

Holy Cross College 
Bachelor of Philosophy 

Clinico-Pathologic Society (Presi- 
dent 4; Blue and Gold 4. 

Homeopathic Hospital of Rhode 
Island, Providence, Rhode Island 




SIDNEY SHORE 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

Temple University 
Bachelor of Arts 

Homeopathic Medical and Surgical 
Hospital, Reading Penna. 





JOSEPH F. SHOWERS 
Milton, Penna. 

Bucknell University 

Reimann Oncologic Society; Blue 
and Gold 2, 3; Blue and Gold 
Chairman 4; Club "19". 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





JOHN JOSEPH SMERZNAK 
Concord, North Carolina 

Maryville College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Watts Hospital . 
Durham, N. C. 





warn 




PAUL THOMAS SOULIOTIS 
Worcester. Massachusetts 

Syracuse University 

Clinico-Pathologic Society; Medic 
4; Basketball 1, 2. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 



PETER S. SPAGNUOLO 

Jackson Heights. Long Island, N. Y. 

College of the City of New York 

Holy Name Hospital 
Teaneck, New Jersey 






FRANK HENRY STEGURA 
Nanticoke, Penna. 

Pennsylvania State College 

Clinico-Pathologic Society 

Wyoming Valley Homeopathic 
Hospital, Wilkes-Barre, Penna. 




RUSSEL PHILLIPS STONER 
Mount Joy, Penna. 

Franklin and Marshall College 
Elizabethtown College 
University of Virginia 

Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic So- 
ciety 3, 4; Student Institute 4. 

St. Joseph's Hospital 
Lancaster, Penna. 




MBHM 

■■"■ 




JOHN GORDON STRANCE 
Marietta, Ohio 

Marietta College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic 
Society. 

Bethesda Hospital 
Cincinnati, Ohio 




EUGENE C. STRAUSS 
Fort Dodge, Iowa 

University of Iowa 
Bachelor of Science 

Saint Luke's Hospital 
Duluth, Minnesota 





BENJAMIN FRANKLIN STREETS, JR. 
Sutersville, Penna. 

Washington and Jefferson College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Medic 4. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 





JOHN SUMERS 

New York City. New York 

University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 

Phi Lambda Kappa 
Blue and Gold 4. 

Lincoln City Hospital 
New York City, New York 



JOHN CHALMERS SUTTON, JR. 
New Brighton, Penna. 

Washington and Jefferson College 
Bachelor of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Club "19"; 
Medic 4; Basketball 1, 2, 3. 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 




CARL FRANCIS TARLOWSKI 
Trenton, New Jersey 

Temple University 

Clinico-Pathologic Society. 

William McKinley Memorial Hos- 
pital, Trenton, New Jersey 






HAROLD W. TELGE 
Manchester, New Hampshire 

University of New Hampshire 
Bachelor of Science 

Homeopathic Hospital of Rhode 
Island, Providence, Rhode Island 




ELMER EVERETT TERRELL 
Paris, Illinois 

Franklin College 
Bachelor of Arts 

Alpha Sigma (President) 4; Under- 
graduate Society; VanLennep Surg- 
ical Socety; Club "19"; Blue and 
Gold 3; President Student Institute 4 

Shadyside Hospital 
Pittsburgh, Penna. 

























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FRANK P. TOCCI 
Verona. New Jersey 

New York University 
Bachelor of Science 

Lambda Phi Mu; Medic 4. 

Harlem Hospital 

New York City, New York 




THOMAS WALTER TUCKER 
Dayton, Ohio 

University of Dayton 
Ohio State University 
Bachelor of Science 

Pi Upsilon Rho; Undergraduate So- 
ciety; Blue and Gold 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 






MIGUEL ANGEL VALIENTE 
Corozal, Puerto Rico 

University of Puerto Rico 

Garth W. Boericke Therapeutic So- 
ciety; Medic 4. 

Wilmington Homeopathic Hospital 
Wilmington, Delaware 




ARMAND FRANK VERGA 
Jersey City, New Jersey 

Bucknell University 
Bachelor of Science 

VanLennep Surgical Society; Clin- 
ico-Pathologic Society; Undergrad- 
uate Society; Reimann Oncologic 
Society; Club "19"; Student Institute 
3, 4; Class President 3, 4. 

Fitkin Memorial Hospital 
Neptune, New Jersey 




_ 



FRANK A. VERI 
Lancaster, Penna. 

Franklin and Marshall College 
Bachelor of Science 

VanLennep Surgical Society; Clin- 
ico-Pathologic Soceity; Medic Busi- 
ness Manager 4. 

St. Joseph's Hospital 
Lancaster, Penna. 




CHARLES WILLIAM WEBER 
Abington, Penna. 

Lehigh University 
Drexel Institute 
Bachelor of Science 
Chemical Engineer 

Phi Alpha Gamma; Medic 4. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





FORNEY D. WINNER 
Lock Haven, Penna. 

Dartmouth University 
Tulane University 
Pennsylvania State College 
Temple University 
University of Pennsylvania 
Bachelor of Arts 
Master of Science 

Phi Alpha Gamma. 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





JOSEPH L. WITKOWSKI 
Shenandoah, Penna. 

Pennsylvania State College 

Hahnemann Hospital 
Philadelphia, Penna. 





R. BRUCE ZERBE 
Tremont, Penna. 

Ursinus College 
Bachelor of Science 



Alpha Sigma; Reimann Oncologic 
Society; Blue and Gold 4. 

Pottsville Hospital 
Pottsville, Penna. 





DAVID N. BLOOM 
Philadelphia, Penna. 

University of Alabama 
Bachelor of Arts Master of Science 

1913-1938 



'He has outsoared the shadow of our night; 
Envy and calumny and hate and pain. 
And that unrest which men miscall delight. 
Can touch him not and torture not again." 



m^H 



SENIOR REFLECTIONS 

Four years... of our allotted space... have passed ... Measured by the 
few tangible values . . . that are the only remains of their passing ... a receding 
hair line ... a new vocabulary ... a degree of portliness in our demeanor and 
appearance ... a Doctor's degree... a new way of thinking ... measured by 
these remains. . .those four years might have been considered. . .slow. . .and 
dreary. . .and well rid of. . .and so. . .become unmourned in their passing. . . 
But these things . . . are but the ashes . . . not the fuel which made the four years' 
flame. . .burn so brightly. . .and so swiftly. . .the happenings. . .the high spots 
. . .the sorrows. . .the joys. . .thees are the intangibles. . .which made the four 
years . . . swift in their passing . . . these ... in retrospect . . . are the things . . . which 
have made the past four years an unforgettable part of our lives . . . 

September . . . Nineteen Thirty-six . . . and by the grace of . . . acceptance 
committees. . .grades. . .personality. . .we were finally medical students. . .and 
this was registration week... We wandered... somewhat in awe. . .through 
corridors ... ringing with the glad helloes of upper classmen. . .giving voci- 
ferous demonstration of their joy in finding one another back... Eager fresh- 
men . . . leading not-so-eager fathers . . . with check books in their hands . . . The 
counsel of upper classmen. . ."don't buy those notes". . ."that's a snap course" 
. . ."watch out for prof in that course", .in one ear. . .and out the other. . .and 
then. . .The opening exercises. . .and our first. . .of many hours to be spent in 
the Elkins Amphitheatre . . . and while the Provost welcomed . . . and the Trus- 
tees cautioned . . . and the Dean warned . . . and Dr. Beutner droned . . . we spent 
the time studying this first gathering ... of the men who were to be our class- 
mates. . .and constant companions. . .for the next four years. . .and wondered 
...whether we looked. . .as they... a bit worried ... slightly awed... a little 
concerned . . . and a touch bewildered . . . and so ... it was . . . 

October. . .and nine point zero zero. . .and the beginning of our medical 
education. . .the tumult and the shouting were over. . .gone and far behind. . . 
the good luck wishes of friends and relatives . . . there remained for us . . . only 
a sinking feeling in the pit of the stomach ... as the chemistry department . . . 
in full battle array . . . gave us our first inkling ... of what we were letting our- 
selves in for. . .on that first morning. . .and that chem exam the first day. . . 
define a normal solution. . .and we weren't even sure what a solution was. . . 
Well. . .we were on the way. . .and we did lots of peculiar things those first 
few weeks . . . we rushed madly for front seats in all the lectures . . . took copious 
notes. . .sang the "alma mater". . .first guiltily. . .then loudly. . .and frequently 
. . .bought reams of worthless notes from upper classmen. . .discovered that 
those balconies afforded an excellent view of the nurses home. . .the "babes in 
the woods". . .were learning fast. . .and so. . .we put a caboose on October. . . 
and it was . . . 

November . . . and our first examination . . . and the Histology department 
almost convinced everyone. . .that these medical school exams weren't as 
tough as they were cracked up to be . . . and then a week later . . . and the first 
exam in physiological chem. . .and we weren't so sure. . .We moved into 
anatomy lab... and bought our Gray's Anatomy. . .it seemed kind of the 
authorities to give us that hour rest peroid after lunch... we came back to 
earth with a thud however. . .when one of those pleasant strangers. . .always 
roaming through the lab . . . stopped at our table to give us a quiz one day . . . 
We held rowdy class meetings . . . while the founders of parliamentary pro- 
cedure ... rested uneasy in their tombs. . .and for a week or so... the usual 



142 



hall chatter of... "I'll take Temple and six -"...was supplanted by... "I'll 

vote for your man if ....".. .We discovered that the seniors didn't have the 
market cornered on the nurses. . .in the Hahnemann Luncheonette. . .and that 
a beakerful of boiling colored water... was an excellent way of convincing 
the chem department. . .of one's industriousness. . .while one was out. . .enjoy- 
ing a morning cup of coffee. . .The air. . .over any group of three or five gath- 
ered in the hall. . .was thick with pennies. . .and if this form of wooing Lady 
Luck was too slow... there was always the possibility of a crap game... in 
the back of Room B. . .before Histology lecture. . .In the course of events. . . 
came. . .Thanksgiving vacation ... and four days of welcome relief .. .from 
proteins. . .and clavicles. . .and adnexogenesis. . .and so. . .rested. . .and with 
a new lease on life. . .we came back to. . . 

December. . .and what a December. . .three hectic weeks. . .the town alive 
with Christmas spirit. . .spirit?. . .with a Histology exam impending. . .everyone 
cheerful and happy . . . except us . . . with the approaching grand finale of the 
physiological chem course. . .the chem exam wasn't bad enough. . .we had to 
get our introduction to the firehouse "lecture room?" the same morning., .all 
in all. . .a tough day. . .Then the final orals in chem. . .the fidgeting bunch on 
the bench outside the Dean's office. . .the slowly (oh, so slowly) trickling sands 
of that ten minute glass . . . the low murmur of voices in the hallway . . . Whad'e 
ask ya?". . ."Wuz'e tough?". . .and the feeling we had of walking on air. . . 
and kicking the clouds aside. . .as we finished with Dr. Hepburn. . .and emerg- 
ed from his office. . .with his "Merry Christmas and Happy New Year"... 
ringing in our ears. . .We clung to tradition and gave a Christmas party for 
Dr. Snyder. . .and sang "Arsphenamine". . .while the good Doctor listened. . . 
and Miss Brady blushed. . .and Mike and Carlos rhumbaed . . . and Kissen 
stripped. . .and then did Miss Brady blush. . .We breezed through the Histology 
exam the next day. . .with our minds on train schedules. . .and home cooking 
. . . and Christmas presents . . . stopped long enough ... on our way to trains . . . 
to have some of Dr. Snyder's peanuts and pretzels. . .and so. . .the three hectic 
weeks of December had passed. . .and we were still alive. . .and it was. . . 
Christmas vacation. . .and a few weeks' respite from alarm clocks. . .and 
restaurant food. . .It was nice to be called Doc. . .and hem and haw knowingly 
. . .when the family asked you. . ."what to do about Johnny's cold". . .or "that 
scratch on Mary's arm". . .and so. . .all too soon. . .we came back. . .to a New 
Year. . .and. . . 

January. . .Nineteen Thirty-Seven. . .and some New Year's Resolutions. . . 
about the amount of studying we were going to do . . . and how we were going 
to "knock them dead". . .the second semester. . .they were promptly forgotten 
. . .and somehow or other. . .we had a whole new set of class officers. . .and 
we analyzed everything from bananas to H & H custard pie. . .for Dr. Hepburn 
. . .and we kept the third floor V.F.D. busy putting out ether fires. . .Half-way 
through the month. . .we suddenly realized that Physical Chem. . .and Medical 
Terminology. . .and History of Medicine. . .had final examinations attached to 
them. . .and weren't just pleasant places. . .where the authorities supplied lec- 
tures to lull us to sleep. . .and so. . .we recalled our New Year's Resolutions. . . 
from the wastebaskets of our thoughts. . .and buckled down. . .and the day the 
chem department . . . presented us with our final grades in physiological . . . 
varied were the feelings. . .the pleasantly surprised "A's". . .the expected "B's" 
...the unexpected "C's"...and the unwanted "D's"...and most of us were 
over the first big hurdle in our quest for an M.D. . . .and so. . .the first semester 
died . . . unlamented . . . and it was . . . 

February. . .and a new semester. . .and we were one-eighth doctors. . .as 
some of the boys put it. . .There were some exams. . .but they didn't bother us 
any more. . .There was a class dance. . .where some of the class. . .and most 



143 



of the class treasury. . .passed out. . .and the bull sessions waxed hot. . .in the 
old Kjeldahl room. . .while the more industrious ones ... chased Topfer Units 
and enzymes ... for Dr. Pearson . . . and Dr. Hepburn . . . We grew tired of watch- 
ing surgery clinics. . .in the amphitheatre. . .where we didn't belong... and 
grew more interested. . .in the pool tables. . .in Hering Hall. . .which was out 
of bounds too. . .We tried our hand. . .with some drastic results. . .at some of 
Dr. Borneman's. . .triturations. . .and preparations. . .and histology course be- 
gan to move a mile a minute. . . Neuro-histology . . .orals. . .slide quizzes. . .and 
the big slide quiz . . . with Zerbe beating Abbott to the draw . . . making the whole 
first section ... sit through ancient movies. . .while a bell ... clanged every 
minute . . . across the hall . . . and so . . . came . . . 

March. . .and our first exam in Clinical Chem. . .and the firehouse again 
. . .but we were old hands at the game now. . .and its gloomy dankness could 
no longer faze us . . . March . . . and seventy beakers of urine . . . bubbling merrily 
over seventy Bunsen burners . . . informed everyone within a radius of a block 
. . . that Spring . . . had come to Hahnemann . . . Spring . . . and Dr. Chandler 
lurked in every corner of the third floor. . .and Pop Slocum and Jim . . .had their 
busiest weeks . . . Spring . . . and the penny-matching took on new impetus . . . 
and the balcony outside the chem lab . . . creaked and groaned . . . under the 




J^&jS 



weight of most of the assembled Freshman class. . .as the boys' thoughts lightly 
turned. . .to the nurses. . .across the way. . .and down in the alley below. . . 
Spring. . .with Histology over. . .and Anatomy now moving in earnest. . .and 
it was. . . 

April. . .and warm sunny afternoons spent. . .plucking at greasy muscles 
. . .and tracing endless nerves. . .and the electrical tension one felt throughout 
the entire lab. . .every Friday afternoon. . .just before the Anatomy department 
descended ... en masse... for our weekly quiz sessions. . .the "hot foot" sup- 
planting the "goose"... as the chief class diversion. . .and Dr. Phillips'... 
"How's it going, Men". . .and getting hit with everything from a cadaver wrap- 
ping. . .to a piece of chalk. . .and we partook. . .of Dr. Borneman's hospitality 
...and his beer. . .and his cantharides. . .and. . .lo and behold... it was... 

May . . . and the home stretch . . . and we had our first taste of the Blue and 
Gold. . .and Hal Kemp made us like it. . .And it got hot. . .too hot to appreciate 
Anatomy lab ... so we studied our anatomy in queer places . . . like Shibe Park 
. . . and the roof of the Parkway Library . . . and over cokes ... in the Luncheon- 
ette . . . and as the virulent Spring Fever . . . gnawed at our vitals . . . the member- 
ship of Cholly Hoyt's T.G.I.S. Society grew by leaps and bounds... for eight 



144 



.months had gone by. . .and we were tired of Anatomy. . .and Chemistry. . . 
and Pharmacy. . .and of each other. . .and so. . .after an interminable period 
. . . May . . . became . . . 

June. . .so for a few days. . .anatomy chased chemistry. . .and chemistry 
chased pharmacy. . .and pharmacy chased neuro-anatomy . . .in our troubled 
dreams... and there we were... the "babes in the woods"... of eight short 
months ago ... somewhat wiser. . .slightly chastened ... very weary... but no 
longer bewildered. . .all. . .eager to take a crack. . .at the much malinged. . . 
Sophomore year. . .and so... the summer passed... and it was... 

September. . .Nineteen Thirty-Seven. . .and we were beginning. . . so they 
say... the toughest. . .of our four years at Hahnemann. . .and the Freshman 
year was already. . .only a vague collection of incidents. . .pleasant and un- 
pleasant. . .somewhere in the distant past. . .and we were a tanned and healthy 
bunch. . .resembling little. . .the drooping. . .weary group. . .which had parted 
company in June. . .So. . .after a few days reminiscing. . .about the re-exams 
...and who was back. . .and who wasn't... and the newcomers. . .amongst 
the blondes. . .and brunettes ... on Spring Garden. . .and Green Street. . .we 
moved into. . . 




October. . .and the opening exercises again. . .and we wondered whether 
we hal looked as sorrowful . . . the year before ... as the new crew of Freshmen 
did. . .And Physiology lab. . .we won't forget those first few periods. . .with our 
tempers worn raw. . .by the vagaries of rubber bands. . .and elastic springs. . . 
and writing levers. . .with the street cars rumbling by outside... and the scrawled 
signature of an instructor. . .on a smoked drum. . .the almost unattainable goal 
of our labors. . .and trooping downstairs. . .long after five o'clock. . .grimy with 
smudge and shellac. . .and perhaps some vague nostalgia. . .for those de- 
parted days of our Freshman year. . .when no laboratory ever went beyond 
the five o'clock bell. . .And Anatomy. . .with us again. . .and once again. . .the 
little cubicles. . .on the second floor front. . .resounded with. . ."Duke and four" 
...and "Penn and nine"... and the blackboards. . .confronted one with the 
brachial . . . and cervical plexuses ... in every color of the spectrum . . . and be- 
tween the dirty jokes . . . the horseplay . . . and the football . . . we managed to 
squeeze in a little anatomy. . .and just as we were beginning to realize. . .that 
Bacteriology was no picnic ... it was . . . 

November. . .which passed rather swiftly. . .while we were undergoing the 
daily struggle for survival in Bac. lab... the scourges of mankind. . .weren't 
very interesting as little blue or pink dots under our lenses. . .and anyway. . . 



145 



an afternoon spent in the lab. . .would convince anyone that we had some 
much better scourges in the class. . .and so. . .in the light of flaming cotton 
plugs. . .neath arching streams of water coming from all sides... on stools 
thoughtfully dampened before we sat on them. . .and ducking little missiles 
like test tubes or wadded gauze. . .we enjoyed our Bacteriology lab. . .while 
the faithful few. . .remained glued to their scopes. . .oblivious to the din above 
. . .Dr. Sylvis. . .combined some old neuro-anatomy . . .with some new jokes. . . 
but it was still our favorite siesta hour. . .and of the Navy men could sleep. . . 
why couldn't we. . .and Dr. Beutner. . .covered everything but the floors. . .of 
his lecture rooms. . .with showcards containing "ze formulae". . .and Peck. . . 
bought every pharmacology text in print . . . and so . . . the month ended . . . and 
with it. . .remember. . ."Dear Father: I'm writing this in the Bacteriology Lab- 
oratory, where we are studying, etc. ". . .and so. . .with the wisecracks con- 
cerning that exam ringing in our ears. . .we left. . .for Thanksgiving vacation 
. . .and came back. . .to find the holiday spirit abroad in the town. . . for it 
was. . . 

December. . .with Dr. Scott rambling through the nervous system. . .while 
we filled countless pages of notes. . .and sent acres of frogs to their Valhalla. . . 
in the lab. . .And we sang "Jingle Bells". . .with instrumental accompaniment 
. . . every day . . . for Dr. Sappington . . . who probably detected a plaintive note 
. . .in that jolly tune. . .as the pages of the Bacteriology notes dwindled. . .and 
our concern . . . over coming events . . . mounted . . . Christmas intervened . . . how- 
ever. . .so after depleting the class treasury to buy gifts for every faculty man 
in sight . . . we went home . . . and while the grim spectre of the approaching Bac 
orals. . .hovered somewhere in the background. . .we enjoyed ourselves. . .and 
hemmed and hawed a bit more pompously. . .when someone asked us what 
they should do "about Johnn's cold"... and with staph and strep. . .vague 
annoying figures . . . somewhere in the back of our minds . . . we returned to . . . 

January . . . Nineteen Thirty-Eight ... a new year . . . and a dawning realiza- 
tion of just why the Sophomore year was considered tough. . .the pressure was 
on. . .and we were lost. . .in a bewildering maze of. . .duodenal relations. . . 
and life cycles of filiaria. . .and narcosis. . .and nerve synapses. . .and implied 
contracts. . .and the class was enveloped in an all-pervading gloom. . .which 
quieted the Bac lab . . . and lessened the production of paper airplanes . . . and 
even the most valiant. . .put away their capillary pipettes. . .and their rubber 
bands. . .and thus. . .in a glare of midnight oil. . .January expired. . .and we 
had. . .all too soon we thought. . . 

February. . .and the week of semester finals was upon us. . .an exolosive 
four days. . .with the last day finding us in the Bac lab ... waiting for our 
orals . . . with Miss McDevitt tolling off our doom in groups of threes . . . while 
some roamed aimlessly. . .and some matched pennies. . .and some sat staring 
. . .trying to dissociate arabinose. . .from mannose. . .from hookworms. . .from 
capsules. . .Well. . .it ended. . .and exam week was over. . .and the semester 
was over. . .and we. . .were just about over. . .So. . .we celebrated. . .with a 
class dance. . .and once again. . .the class treasury. . .gave up the gohst. . . 
and with the celebrating over. . .came the knowledge that things were hap- 
pening about us... the second semester was gaining momentum. . .and it 
began to feel like a medical school . . . with Dr. Bristol . . . teaching some Minor 
Surgery. . .along with some of the queerer doings of the folks at Allentown. . . 
and there was even a course called Elementary Medicine. . .and we bought 
stetchoscopes . . . and carried them . . . three months before we needed them in 
Physical Diagnosis. . .and we puzzled a bit. . .over just what that Psycho- 
biology course was about. . .and so. . .with the year at last beginning to show 
some rhyme and reason. . . 



146 



March. . .was upon us. . .and we walked around. . .percussing doors and 
walls. . .and we sweated and fumed. . .trying to get cannualas into various 
places where they didn't belong. . .in dogs and cats. . .and we watched the 
Schuylkill River turned into drinking water. . .and a few weeks later saw that 
water. . .returned to the Delaware ... as sewage. . .and we player switch... 
for Dr. Beutner. . .and Dr. Pearson showed us a dozen new ways of making a 
guinea pig feel bad. . .and before we knew it. . .another Spring had caught up 
with us. . .along with. . . 

April. . .and the urge to linger until the very last minutes of the lunch hour 
... in laughing groups ... on the shady side of Fifteenth Street . . . then regret- 
fully trail off to class. . .Spring. . .and white shoes. . .and paper airplanes. . . 
and the lost art of the "hot foot" revived again. . .Spring. . .and the Path De- 
partment. . .providing complications. . .so. . .we had another session. . .with 
Miss McDevitt. . .and the path lab. . .while Dr. Young's attendance. . .dwindled 
until only the old faithfuls remained. . .and the fourth floor. . .resembled a field 
station. . .after the Marne. . .as Dr. Buck taught us how to do our patients up 
in neat packages. . .and we had with us. . . 

May. . .and Dr. Beutner was still talking about "Narcotics". . .and we were 
practically convinced that. . ."failure to x-ray fractures before and after setting" 
. . .was frowned upon in the best medical circles. . .and Dr. Shollenberg was 
showing signs of running out of cross-sections to talk about. . .while Dr. Scott 
was showing no signs of running out of systems to talk about. . .and some of 
the conscientious lads. . .tried to see. . .fibrosis. . .and lymphocytic infiltration 
. . .for Dr. Sappington's sake. . .while most of us. . .went for a walk. . .or to a 
ball game. . .instead. . .and somebody completed our joy. . .by lettting Anat- 
omy into the curricula again. . .and there we were. . .hounded from pillar to 
post again. . .it felt like January. • -but it was. . . 

June. . .so we polished off the finals. . .and the year. . .and we were half- 
way there . . . measured by the faculty standards . . . we had a fair groundwork 
for our clinical years. . .but we had our own standards. . .we could hold our 
beer. . .we could hit a dartboard at five yards. . .we knew every nurse in the 
hospital. . .in fact. . .there wasn't a thing the Seniors could do that we couldn't 
. . .so. . .the tough Sophomore year was over. . .and they could bring on. . . 
their "clinical years". . .and so. . .we went to camps. . .and some became life- 
guards. . .and some swung picks and shovels. . .and most of us just loafed. . . 
until . . . 

October. . .Nineteen Thirty-Eight. . .and we came back. . Juniors. . .the 
laboratory and didactic work. . .far behind us. . .or so we thought. . .and this 
was one of the "clinical years". . .and we were all set to spend our time. . . 
parading around the hospital . . . smiling condenscendingly at poor benighted 
Freshmen and Sophomores. . .so the class businessmen. . .did a land office 
business. . .in thermometers. . .and percussion hammers. . .and flashlights... 
Well . . . the delusion was nice while it lasted . . . but the faculty must have 
thought the altitude too rare for us. . .because it wasn't long. . .until we were 
again boiling urine . . . this time for Dr. Sappington . . . the surroundings were 
different. . .but the odor was the same. . .and Dr. Sylvis. . .dug up the nice 
black boxes of slides. . .which had plagued us through the first two years. . . 
and we still weren't sure we saw tumor cells. . .Even the water on our stools. . . 
had that old familiar feeling. . .when we sat in it. . .and so. . .with the realiza- 
tion this. . ."clinical year"... was but a snare and a delusion. . .we settled 
down to work. . .and were just beginning to understand the intracicies of the 
Junior schedule. . .and feeling good about our ability to find the majority of 
classes. . .when it was. . . 



1 17 



November. . .and we trekked. . .from Hering Hall. . .to the "Annex". . .and 
back to Hering Hall... and back again to the "Annex" .. .and the drizzle of 
lecture notes became a storm . . . and the storm became a blizzard . . . and we 
drowned ... in a flood of lecture notes . . . that showed no signs of relenting . . . 
and the long days. . .became a succession of lectures. . .and courses ... Dr. 
Mercer . . . pounded Obstetrics into us . . . and Dr. Lafferty . . . tried to drag it out 
. . .we learned about women. . .from Dr. Frosch. . .and what they can do to 
men . . . from Dr. Kenworthy . . . We stopped long enough to hold a class dance 
). .and this time... since it wasn't official ... the class treasury lived through 
it. . .but it was rather quiet. . .because we wern't used to bright ballroom lights 
. . .after the gloom of the "Annex". . .and our hands weer far more accustomed 
to the grip of a fountain pen . . . than the waist of a female . . . and Thanksgiving 
vacation came ... to briefly dam . . . the rising tide ... of lecture notes ... so we 
all went home . . . and sprinkled our conversations . . . with cryptic remarks as . . . 
"LOA". . .and "G-I". . .and "OBS" and "GYN". . .and "G-U". . .it didn't do any 
harm. . .and helped the folks realize we were Juniors. . .even if we didn't feel 
that way . . . and so we dragged our long and weary faces . . . back once again 
to mingle with. . .the cheerful holiday crowds. . .for it was. . . 

December. . .and a close observer. . .could see the earliest signs of the 
class' spirit returning ... with now and then. . .a paper airplane. . .floating 




gently downward. . .or the thud of a well-aimed paper wad. . .awakening us 
from our lethargy. . .and darned if the curriculum wasn't right. . .we were 
seeing patients. . .so it must be a "clinical year". . .Dr. Ferguson. . .was hand- 
ing us a bedside manner. . .with the emphasis on the hands. . .and we had 
reached the point. . .where we could examine a female chest. . .for Dr. 
McDeldowney . . .without wanting to hide under the bed. . .and we were going 
through the stage . . . where every lub . . . and dub . . . sounded like a murmur . . . 
but in spite of the patients. . .the lecture notes mounted higher. . .and the class 
ego . . . received another boost . . . when the Seniors departed for Allenown . . . 
and we were masters of all we surveyed. . .for a week. . .We didn't have much 
opportunity to enjoy our exalted position. . .however. . .because the first ten 
week section . . . ended at the same time . . . and we received our first taste ... of 
the bane of all Junior existence. . .exams. . .and there it was Christmas again 
... so we all went home . . . and this time . . . when the neighbor asked us . . . 
what to do "about Johnny's cold"... we told them... in five or ten thousand 
well-chosen words. . .and we had an enjoyable time. . .until along about the 
last quarter of the Rose Bowl game . . . when it occurred to a lot of us . . . that Dr. 
Sappington . . . and his department . . . were going to request the pleasure of our 
company ... at a little session . . . soon after we got back . . . so . . . we came back 
... a bit worried . . . to . . . 



148 



January. . .Nineteen Thirty-Nine. . .and there was a brief lull before the 
storm. . .and we became a self-appointed body of building inspectors. . .watch- 
ing closely. . .every detail of construction in the new building. . .to see that 
nothing went wrong with our pride and joy. . .when suddenly. . .an explosion 
. . .and someone had put the order for. . .exams B.I.D. and T.I.D. . . .on our 
chart... so we told them ... about ... hypochromic macrocytic anemias. . .and 
primary beta radiations. . .and bronchophony. . .and collecting sewers. . .and 
retroversion. . .and caloric requirements. . .and breast milk. . .and modalities 
. . .and rest, rubber sheets and a hand dip at the door. . .and so. . .in between 
a couple of exams. . . 

February. . .was born. . .and as we dashed through the Hygiene exam. . . 
the last one of exam week. . .most of us. . .were incapable of any feeling. . . 
except one of. . .overwhelming relief. . .But we didn't get a chance to stop 
bouncing ... as we resumed the trek . . . and the lecture notes reached moun- 
tainous proportions. . .Dr. Ashcraft. . .fished up prostate after prostate. . .for our 
edification. . .and Dr. Schofield matched him. . .with hemorrhoid after hemor- 
rhoid. . .and Dr. Clemmer. . .introduced us to all the things that could happen 
to. . ."the old girl". . .before, during and after. . .a visit from the stork. . .and 
in the "Annex" . . .we got all tangled up in forceps. . .while disputing the "slick- 
ness of Mother Nature". . .with Dr. Mercer. . .and Dr. Kirby. . .was just getting 




warmed up on. . ."REST, both mental and physical". . .and while we waited. . . 
for Dr. Steinhilber. . .to lecture on one disease. . .with a good prognosis. . .the 
month died . . . and it was . . . 

March. . .and we longed a bit. . .for the constant. . .hundred and five 
degree temperature of the Fire House ... as the air conditioners ... in the new 
lecture rooms. . .blew hot. . .and cold. . .but never temperate. . .and the stacks 
of lecture notes. . .began to worry us a little. . .when our thoughts drifted to 
May . . . whence we know . . . would come the reckoning . . . but the stacks grew 
. . .unheeding. . .as Dr. Leopold. . .traced gut and omentum all over the place 
. . .and Dr. Boericke. . .mentioned for the nteenth time. . .bloating. . .and acid 
eructations . . . and foul offensive discharges . . . and it sounded exactly the same 
... as all the drugs ... of all the lectures past . . . and scattered midst the note 
taking. . .we saw a patient or two. . .three weeks of G-U dispensary. . .without 
getting above the belt once. . .and Pediatrics ward assignments. . .providing a 
pleasant opportunity to play with toys. . .and renew our acquaintance. . .with 
Tom Swift. . .and the Rover Boys. . .and with Dr. Kirby. . .reiterating. . ."REST" 
. . . we had . . . 

April . . . and another Spring . . . and anyone . . . who faced the front ... in 
the amphitheatre. . .while someone in the back had a gown handy. . .left 



149 



hmiself wide open ... for anything from a simple bruise ... to a compound frac- 
ture of the skull... And we were getting organ accompaniment. . .to most of 
the lectures in Rooms A and B. . .and Dr. Sylvis. . .had only to look up and 
point a finger. . .and they could hear our answering. . ."REST, SUNSHINE AND 
HYPERNUTRITION"...at City Hall. . .And some playful soul. . .touched a 
match to a theormostat . . . and the air conditioners . . . ceased blowing . . . even 
hot and cold. . .And the class marksmen discovered. . .that BB shot. . .could be 
aimed more accurately . . . and get a much better reaction . . . than paper wads 
... so that after Dr. Frank turned out the lights . . . the center of a tornado . . . 
was much safer... than Room A. . .and still. . .the lecture notes mounted... 
and Dr. Kirby. . .was still reiterating. . ."REST". . .as the month. . .gave way 
to. .. 

May. . .and more juniors showed up for the Blue and Gold. . .and Glen 
Gray. . .than had been turning up for most classes. . .and lots of the boys. . . 
still didn't know. . .what Dr. Miley. . .or Dr. Geckeler. . .looked like. . .and they 
posted an exam schedule in the office . . . and we looked at it every ten minutes 
. . . but they were way ahead of us . . . because every time we looked . . . there 
were two or three more exams . . . on it . . . and we were tired ... of sitting . . . and 
writing. . .and lectures. . .and clinics. . .and ourselves. . .and each other. . .and 
the lecture notes mounted. . .as Dr. Goldsmith sped. . .and Dr. Hollis galloped 
...and Dr. Lane pounded. . .and Dr. Carpenter cajoled. . .till we felt... as 
though our heads would burst . . . with the addition of one more medical fact . . . 
and we looked again. . .and the exam schedule had taken on. . .a second 
sheet... and the lecture noes... still mounted. . .until finally .. .they wavered 
. . .and toppled over upon us. . .and. . .the reckoning had come. . .and some- 
how . . . about ten days . . . and twenty exams later ... it was . . . 

June . . . and some more exams . . . was it twenty-five ... or thirty-five ... or 
fifty exams. . .we took. . .We were weary. . .and if we didn't know the answers 
. . .the guy next to us did. . .and if he didn't. . .then the devil with it. . .because 
we were tired. . .and we didn't care if the school burnt down. . .or they threw 
us out. . .or if they gave medicine back to the witch doctors. . .But it was over 
. . .and even the prospect of glorious Seniorhood. . .failed to stir our pulses. . . 
and the Junior year was over. . .and we were tired. . .and blase. . .and. . .we 
didn't care. . .which was the attitude that clung to us. . .all summer. . .through 
Junior internships. . .and camp jobs. . .and loafing. . .and was still with us. . . 
when we returned to . . . 

October. . .Nineteen Thirty-Nine. . .and the promised land of the Senior 
year . . . and the world was our apple . . . And we marveled a bit ... at the dif- 
ference. . .that the three tonsillectomies. . .and seven lumbar punctures. . .and 
ninety -eight intravenouses . . .which most of us had done during junior intern- 
ships .... had wrought in the appearance of our fellow classmates . . . the boys 
were beginning to look like Doctors. . .and the talk... "In my clinical ex- 
perience ". . ."So I told the Chief ". . .and thus. . .all the imperceptible 

changes . . . which had been going on for three years . . . had crystallized . . . over 
the summer. . .So. . .with eight long months. . .until June. . .and graduation. . . 
we commandeered the pool tables . . . and dart board in Hering Hall . . . and the 
pinball machine in the Luncheonette. . .and the hall in front of the cage for 
our "bull sessions". . .for these were the pursuits of Seniors ... from time im- 
memorial . . . and it was only ■ . • 

November . . . and we still had seven months of our sentence to serve out . . . 
but the days were moving fast. . .especially for those who were starting them 
at noon. . .and Dr. Klopp was broadcasting. . .on the Room A and B hook-up. . . 
and we got "the zykoses". . .and the Juniors had the fun. . .and the odds were 
three to one. . .that any collection of two or more seniors. . .thrown together. . . 
would be talking about internships . . . And we started working on our second 



150 



carload. . .of Phenobarb. Cap. gr. ss...in the Medical Dispensary. . .and Dr. 
Boericke. . .was still mentioning. . .belching. . .and sour eructations. . .and foul 
secretions. . .for every drug in the book. . .and the Medical section. . .blossom- 
ed out in boutonierres . . .every day. . .while the sixth floor nurses. . .wondered 
what happened to all those flowers. . .every morning. . .And by this time. . .the 
Industrial Medicine lecture. . .had become a lonelier place... than some of 
the far reaches of Frankford. . .And so. . .it came to be Thanksgiving. . .and 
we took some time off. . .to go home and scare the family. . .with our newly 
acquired professional dignity. . .and chase internships. . .and eventually came 
back to . . . 

December. . .and still... time on our hands... and only three weeks to 
go. . .till Allentown. . .which we spent writing. . ."Patient feels about same, no 
new complaints". . .on student sheets... in the wards. . .and wondering... 
whether we would ever see a case of... Typhoid Fever. . .and waiting for 
hospital elevators. . .and waiting for Miss Whelan. . .to fill out requests. . .and 
while waiting for all these. . .we took a few exams. . .and so. . .we waited out 
December. . .and it was. . .Allentown. . .here we come. . .and the ride up. . . 
with the ingenuity of the Senior class... soon overcoming the thoughtfulness 
of the street car company. . .who had removed bells. . .and nailed down every- 
thing movable in the cars. . .but had forgotten. . .that someone might venture 




into a lavatory . . . and so . . . having surmounted obstacles like hot boxes . . . 
and broken windows. . .we swarmed into the Americus. . .and the school 
authorities. . .and the Allentown Police. . .and the hotel management. . .crossed 
their fingers. . .while we settled down. . .for our week's stay there. . .which was 
rather quiet. . .considering our reputation for playfulness. . .So we spent a 
week. . .of mornings. . .and afternoons. . .walking through cheerless wards. . . 
steeped in the odor of misery. . .and listening to the tales. . .of one who was 
"backed up against a cellar door". . .and one who was railroaded. . .and Dr. 
Hoffman's. . ."Are you happy here". . .through the long afternoons. . .and we 
sought devious means at night... to overcome the depression. . .which the 
days wrought on us... the town had its greatest per capita consumption of 
beer... in its history ... that week. . .and a portion of the class. . .discovered 
that they learn their crap shooting well. . .in Puerto Rico. . .and another portion 
discovered. . .that the business manager of their yearbook. . .was the only 
guy in the class. . .who could fill in an inside straight consistently. . .and the 
boys with sweethearts . . . sat around the hotel lobby at night . . . while the boys 
with wives back home. . .made the most of their freedom. . .and "The Daugh- 
ters of Israel". . .held a highly successful dance. . .and some o fthe boys grew 
so expert. . .that they could drop a hard roll. . .in a bowl of soup. . .at twenty 

(Continued on Page 217) 



151 





Ill 





JUNIOR CLASS 



President Lewis A. Steinhilber 

Vice-President Vincent A. DeRosct 

Secretary Sidney I. Brody 

Treasurer A - Eaton Roberts 

Student Institute Representative Rudolph E. Wamecke 



154 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Adams, Lambi N. 
Althoff. Charles C. 
Arnold, Carrington G. 
Auringer, Arthur J. 
Bailey, Donald M. 
Ballard, George T. 
Battaglia, Albert J. 
Baum, Jerome N. 
Beery, Emerson B. 
Bekampis, Eugene H. 
Bogosian, Armen 
Bolton, Alexander A. Jr. 
Bozig. Albert F. 
Brauer, Charles K. 
Brill, Francis W. 
Britsch, William P. Jr. 
Brody, Sidney I. 
Buczkowski, Joseph T. 
Budenz, G. Charles 
Burdett. James J. 
Buxeda, Fernando L. 
Carter, Alfred G. T. 
Chrzanowski, John A. 
Cicione, Edward T. 
Colon-Fontan, Angel B. 
Concello, Joseph A. 
Cook, Homer E. 
Couch, Manfred R. 
Courtney, John J. 
Covintree, George E. 
Cox, Jack E. 
Dantzig, Henry 
DeBold, Charles, Jr. 
Degling, Erwin G. 
DeLuca, Joseph M. 
DeRosa, Vincent A. 
DiGiacobbe, Hugo R. 
Edmundson, Walter F. 
Eger, Saul D. 
Erb, Alfred W. 
Fas-Fagundo, Nayip 
Froio, Gregory F. 
Gebele, William X. 



Goodman, Herman M. 
Granatir. William L. 
Greenspan, Herbert S. 
Gribbin, James A. 
Gueovpian, Armen H. 
Harrop, Joseph K. 
Hart, J. Robert 
Heinrich, Ward D. 
Hernandez-Camara, Wilbert 
Hladycy, J. Jacob 
Hofmann, Valentine A. 
Hultzman, Ellis K. 
Kelly, Frank J. 
Keown, Kenneth K. 
Ketcham, Frederick 
Krounold, Milton L. 
Kummer, William M. 
Lanard, Francis W. 
Laufenberg, Joseph W. 
Lavoie, Robert J. 
Leber, Alfred P. 
Legg, George E. 
Leman, William W. 
Lenhart, Amos E. 
Liberi. Alfred A. 
Linn, Robert H. 
Littleton, Thomas R. 
Lonergan, Francis J. 
Lovell, Donald R. 
Maclntyre, Donald E. 
Makarchek, Sigmund J. 
Matzko, Michael J. 
McGovern, Edward B. 
Mclntyre, William A. 
Merle, James J. 
Mikan, Venzel R. 
Miller, Frank L. 
Mintz, Solomon S. 
Morgan, William F. 
Moyer, Warren F. 
O'Connor, John J. 
O'Hara, William A. 
Okulicz. Stanley J. 
Palmer, Arnaldo 



Palmgren, Einar A.. Jr. 
Patterson, Walter 
Pechan, Bernard W. 
Pennock, Thomas H. 
Pinto, Joseph C. 
Piver, William C. 
Prout, John W. 
Redcay, Robert A. 
Richlan, Alfred R. 
Roberts, A. Eaton 
Robinson, Irving W. 
Roman-Vega, Desiderio A. 
Rosner, Albert 
Rosnick, Manning J. 
Rothrock, Willoughby J. 
Rush, Martin R. 
Ruta, John P. 
Sacks, Charles L. 
Salmon, George G., Jr. 
Schadel, Lees M., Jr. 
Schlosser, Woodrow D. 
Serena, M. John 
Simon. Edward J. 
Sivak, Michael V. 
Steinhilber, Lewis A. 
Stern, Francis H. 
Taboroff, Leonard H. 
Terry, Willard B. G.. Jr. 
Them, Albert H., Jr. 
Tucker, Wilson D. 
Tushim, Joseph N. 
Vetter, Thomas H. 
Vogel, Louis, Jr. 
Walsh, Redmond B. 
Warnecke, Rudolph E. 
Warner, Norman M. 
Weber, John I. 
Weber, Lennard L. 
Weightman, Joseph 
White, Richard K. 
Woodworth, Jess J.. Jr. 
Yost, Charles S. 
Ziegenhorn, Karl H. H. 



155 



^s> 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



President John L. Kelly 

Vice-President Cornelius J. Regan 

Secretary Bertram M. Bernstein 

Treasurer Daniel J. McCarron 

Student Institute Representative Charles O. Tyler 



156 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Acevedo-DeFillo, Carlos E. 
Allen, Joseph H. 
Anastor, Herbert P. 
Aneses-Arrache, Jose 
Battafarano, eLonard A. 
Beirne, Donald P. 
Bernstein, Bertram M. 
Billman, Howard G. 
Black, Daniel E., Jr. 
Blanchard, William H. 
Block, Charles 
Boc, Stanley F. 
Bogucki, Alfred S. 
Boros, William K. 
Boudwin, Norman K. 
Boyle, Daniel E. 
Brown, Frank H., Jr. 
Brownstein, Israel E. 
Brunhofer, Andrew C, Jr. 
Bryan, Charles E. 
Burnett, Joseph W. 
Campbell, James C. 
Campbell, William J. 
Canelis, Michael 
Conino-Pont, Fernando M. 
Canter. Donald 
Cassidy, Joseph A. 
Ciccarelli. Armanno W. 
Cirelli, Gerald Morris 
Corbett, William T. 
Crane, Nathan 
Croyle, Ray W. 
Davilla-Boria, Julio E. 
DePiero, Nicholas 
Deshong, Howard C. 
DiRocco, Vincent P. 
Duffy, Robert W. 
Etzl, Michael M. 
Faller, William W. 
Faringer, David R„ Jr. 
Febbraro, Anthony A. 
Fitzgerald, Orville M. 
Furey. Charles A. 
Geyer, Samuel V. 
Gregg, Lester O., Jr. 



Guarini, Pasquale 
Gutnick, Morton 
Hall, John R. 
Hamborsky, Eugene M. 
Hare, James 
Harps, James A. 
Hauck, Francis A. 
Hege, John H. 
Hess, Chester C. 
Hill, Robert C. 
Horner, John I. 
Hughes, David W. 
Hughes, Lloyd W. 
Hulick, George S. 
Jenike. Thomas S. 
Kelly, John L. 
Kimble, Leroy R. 
King. Cedric S. 
Kobylanski, Joseph M. 
Kowalqk. Edward A. 
Kozak, Walter H. 
Kram, John E. 
Kraus, Edward I. 
Krick, Earl S. 
Krzywicki, Paul L. 
Kullbom, Kenneth B. 
Ledden, Lewis J. 
Leibundguth. Henry 
Luddecke, Hugh F. 
Magilner, Louis 
Manuzak, Hubert F. 
Marconus, Joseph T. 
Marino, Daniel J. 
Matlack, Harold E. 
Mazor, Jack 
McCarron, Daniel J. 
McCormack. George A.. Jr. 
McMarland, Malcolm D. 
Melenkevitz, Victor T. 
Merscher, Walter F. 
Meile, John G. 
Mikesic, Michael G. 
Miller, Walter 
Moser, Christian E. 
Mosig, John J. 



Mudafort, Sarkis M. 
Nadworny, Adolph J. 
Norley, Walter N., Jr. 
Ragan, Joseph M., Jr. 
Ranallo, John J. 
Reeves, James A. 
Regan, Cornelius J. 
Reilly, Joseph B. 
Reithmayer, Edward N. 
Ritter, Charles W. 
Roasberry, William R. 
Robinson, James J. 
Robinson, Joseph 
Ronan, Robert B. 
Rosario-Santos, Angel R. 
Rosenberg, Hyman 
Rosenstein, Herman 
Ross, John T. 
Roth, John F. 
Rugh, P. Wallace 
Scanlon, James G. 
Seyler, Raymon Q. 
Shields, William E. 
Shinkawa, Shigeo 
Shiraishi, Toyohiko J. 
Smith, William T. 
Starcke, Sewell K. 
Strenski, John 
Sudimack, George A. 
Sverdlik, Samuel S. 
Swick, Jesse H. 
Szary, Leo J. 
Talmage, Walter R. 
Tanous, John H. 
Tihansky, Theodore B. 
Tindall, Herbert L. 
Touzeau, Arthur T. 
Tyler, Charles O. 
Usserow, M. Robert 
VanMater, John S. 
Weinstock. Jerome L. 
Werts. Kenneth G. 
White, Philip F. 
Williams, Russell K. 
Yocum, Paul H. 



157 




FRESHMAN CLASS 



President Bede F. Howard 

Vice-President William J. McHugh, Jr. 

Treasurer Joseph J. Leskin 

Secretary Max R. Goldstein 

Student Institute Representative Frank J. Frosch, Jr. 



158 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Allebach, Gustave S. 
Alvin, John A. 
Apple. Stanley B. 
Arsenios, Geore D. 
Atkins, John H. 
Balin, Solomon L. 
Batten, James C. 
Beckert, Rudolph H. 
Bcrman, Richard 
Bolton. John D. 
Brady, Francis J. E. 
Brewer, Wesley D. 
Brumersky, Harry J. 
Byrne, William A. 
Carter, Edward F., Jr. 
Clark, Morris B., Jr. 
Coane. Morton R. 
Conn, Edwin M. 
Coltman, Arthur B. 
Congello, Anthony M. 
Conrad, Donald C. 
Cooper, William M. 
Costello. Daniel F. 
Cullen, Charles J. 
Cunningham, Howard K. 
Danner, Donald M. 
Davis, James C, Jr. 
DeDominics, Frank A. 
Delafrange, Kenneth M. 
Duck, Walter O. 
Duffy, John M„ Jr. 
Dunsmore, Rembrandt H. 
Ezaki, Toshio 
Fedack, William J. 
Fischer, Herman 
Fitzpatrick, John F. 
Flynn, Paul L. 
Foster, Hollis J., Jr. 
Fox, Wesley B. 
Frosch, Frank J., Jr. 
Gallagher, Leo B. 
Gibbons, Robert F. 
Giddings, Lane 
Gizinski, Norbert S. 
Golden, Robert J. 
Goldstein, Max R. 
Gorman. John J. 
Grasley, William C. 
Grieco, Victor F. 
Grotzinger, Paul J. G. 



Hamilton, George R. 
Hammond, Willis E. 
Hanna, Louis E. 
Hanysh, Myron C 
Hechler, Robert F. 
Hely, Charles J. 
Hereter-Alvarez, Jorge A. 
Herring, Livious D. 
Hess, Ivan W. 
Hess, Paul G. 
Hetzler, Clyde W. 
Heydt, Ernest H., Jr. 
Hoffman, Harry P. 
Howard. Bede F. 
Howrie, William C. F., Jr. 
Hunter, Albert L., Jr. 
Irwin, Richard M. 
Iungerich, Alexander 
Jancisics, Mathew J., Jr. 
Jarrett, Paul B. 
Kassell, Martin B. 
Kistler, Kermit K. 
Klimkevich, Albert J. 
Knox, Frederick H., Jr. 
Konecke, Carl J. 
Kowallek, Paul J.. Jr. 
Krebs, Ernst T. 
Krieger, Harry L. 
Kumkumian, Edward S. 
Lake, George L. 
Lapihuska, William 
Lapin, Alfred R. 
Laudenslager, E. Clifford 
Leeper, Robert H. 
Lepore, John 
Leskin, Joseph J. 
Lipschutz, Arthur 
Lynch, Michael F. 
Maida, Gennaro G. 
Mancinelli, Mario J. 
Martinez-Funes, Jose F. 
Massey. Franklin C. 
McAvoy, Harry D. 
McClimans, Frank E. 
McHugh, William J„ Jr. 
McKee, Wayne O. 
Meng, Ralph H. 
Mohnach, Vladimir 
Morison, James P. 



Morris, Raymond A. 
Muchlado, Felix J. 
Mullarkey, James W. 
Murphy, Foster E. 
Murphy, Ian D. 
Nahas, Elias N. 
Noel, John A. 
Norley, Theodore 
Novak, Edward J. 
Oyer, Robert S. 
Paisley, Ellwood S. 
Petrone, Peter A. 
Polevoy, Pomeroy E. 
Policarpo, Nicholas J. A. 
Poulsen, Russell P. 
Pullen, Harvey T. 
Rambo, Oscar N., Jr. 
Records, Sari J. 
Rudnick, Herman D. 
Scarpa, Harry C. 
Schmick, Jesse E. 
Scott, William D. 
Sellers, David E., Jr. 
Sexton, Richard J. 
Seybold, Carl S., Jr. 
Shade, Jacob G. 
Shepard, Vitol S. 
Shields, Henry A. 
Sholler, Nicholas A. 
Skyer. Joseph R. 
Sollami, William R. 
Sollot, Herbert 
Soss, Thomas L. 
Staples, Herman D. 
Stewart, John A. 
Stoecklein, Herbert G. J. 
Stovall, Henry P. 
Teskey, William F. 
Toth, William 
VanSaun, William A. 
Vazquez-Milan, Hiram 
vonDeilen, Arthur W. 
Wagener, William L., Jr. 
Wells, Fullerton B. H. 
Williams, Richard D. 
Wilson. George W. 
Witherspoon, Robert G. 
Wrona, Eugene A. 
Yost, George F. 
Zogby, Albert J. 



159 













Ill 





PHI ALPHA GAMMA 

GAMMA CHAPTER 

President William R. Clarkson 

Vice President George E. Engelhard 

Treasurer Alan R. Kannapel 

Secretary Amos E. Lenhert 

Editor Lewis A. Steinhilber 




162 



Class of 1940 



Carl F. Buechle 
Henry H. Canton 
William R. Clarkson 
Joseph W. Ehrhart 
George E. Engelhard 
Kenneth D. Ervin 



Russell M. Evans 
Everardo Goyanes 
Charles W. Hoyt 
Alan R. Kannapel 
Richard E. Lang 



Hugh J. Lenahan 
Carl A. Leyrer 
Lee Pullen 
Benjamin F. Streets 
John C. Sutton, Jr. 
Charles W. Weber 



Carrington G. Arnold 
Arthur J. Auringer 
Donald M. Bailey 
merson B. Beery 
George E. Covintree 
Walter F. Edmundson 



Class of 1941 

Robert J. Hart 
Kenneth K. Keown 
Joseph W. Laufenberg 
Amos E. Lenhert 
Francis J. Lonergan 



Bernard W. Pechan 
William C. Piver 
Lewis A. Steinhilber 
Jess J. Woodworth, Jr. 
Charles S. Yost 
Carl H. H. Ziegenhorn 



William H. Blanchard 
Robert W. Duffey 
James Hare 



Class of 1942 

David W. Hughes 
George S. Hulick 
Thomas S. Jenike 



Malcolm D. McFarland 
William R. Roasberry 
Robert B. Ronan 



John H. Atkins 
Morris B. Clark, Jr. 
Walter O. Duck 
Rembrandt H. Dunsmore 
Wesley B. Fox 
Frank J. Frosch, Jr. 



Class of 1943 

Ernest H. Heydt, Jr. 
Harry P. Hoffman 
Frederick H. Knox, Jr. 
Robert H. Leeper 
Wayne O. McKee 
Theodore Norley 
Ellwood S. Paisley 



Russell P. Poulsen 
Carl J. Records 
William D. Scott 
Herbert G. J. Stoecklein 
William Toth 
Robert G. Witherspoon 



Horst A. Agerty, M.D. 
O. F. Barthmaier, M.D. 
Michael J. Bennett, M.D. 
Paul J. Burkett, M.D. 
J. Antrim Crellin, M.D. 
Henry L. Crowther, M.D. 
John H. Davie, M.D. 
H. Franklin Flanagan, M.D. 
Carl C. Fischer, M.D. 
Frank J. Frosch, M.D. 
Richard R. Gates, M.D. 
Russell D. Geary, M.D. 
Theodore C. Geary, M.D. 
J. Rawlins Ginther, M.D. 
Arthur J. Hartley, M.D. 



Fraters in Facultate 

Oscar E. Heim, M.D. 
Warren S. Hoenstine, M.D. 
Romaine C. Hoffman, M.D. 
John E. James, M.D. 
J. Miller Kenworthy, M.D. 
Paul M. Kistler, M.D. 
Warren S. Kistler, M.D. 
Henry D. Lafferty, M.D. 
Lowell L. Lane, M.D. 
Jacob H. Lehman, M.D. 
Bruce V. MacFayden. M.D. 
John H. McCutcheon, M.D. 
William L. Martin, M.D. 
George H. McKeown, M.D. 



Harry B. Mark, M.D. 
Robert J. McNeill, Jr., M.D. 
Albert Mutch, M.D. 
David Northrop, M.D. 
Richard F. Northrop, M.D. 
Desiderio Roman, M.D. 
S. W. Sappington, M.D. 
James Seligman, M.D. 
Alfred R. Seraphin, M.D. 
E. Dallett Sharpless, M.D. 
C. L. Shollenberger, M.D. 
Walter J. Snyder, M.D. 
E. A. Steinhilber. M.D. 
William H. Sylvis, M.D. 
Peter J. Warter, M.D. 



163 





ALPHA SIGMA 

BETA CHAPTER 

President Elmer Everett Terrell 

Vice President Homer Elms Cook 

Secretary Francis William Lanard 

Treasurer Robert Bruce Zerbe 



164 



Class of 1940 



Hugh Joseph Burns 



John Schofield Hopping 
Franklin Kugler Nelk 



Robert Bruce Zcrbe 



Class of 1941 

Francis Walter Brill Armen Haik Gueovjian 

Alfred Gabriel Thomas Carter Ward Dittmar Heinrich 
Homer Elms Cook Francis William Lanard 

Charles DeBold. Jr. Robert Hayes Linn 

Erwin George Degling 



Sigmund John Makarchek 
Stanley John Okulicz 
Alfred Ralph Richlan 
Mario John Serena 
Joseph Nicholas Tushim 



Frank Halstead Brown, Jr. 
Orville Moyer Fitzgerald 
John Leo Kelley, Jr. 
Edward Adam Kowalyk 
Walter Harold Kozak 



Class of 1942 

Henry Leibundguth 
Hugh Freer Luddecke 
Edwin Nyce Reithmayer 
Herbert Lincoln Tindall 



Charles Orlan Tyler 
John Stroud VanMater 
Donald Peter Beirne 
Francis James Kelley, Jr. 
Russell Kenneth Williams 



William Austin Byrne 
Edward Fenton Carter, Jr. 
William Marion Cooper 
John Anderson Stewart 
William John Fedak 



Class of 1943 

Robert Francis Gibbons 
Robert Joseph Golden 
William Charles Grasley 
Livious Duncan Herring 



Frank Eugene McClimans 
James Peters Morrison 
Jesse Elias Schmick 
William Francis Teskey 
Fullerton Barton Hartley Wells 



Garth W. Boericke, M.D. 
Lester Leroy Bower, M.D. 
William Buck, M.D. 
E. W. Campbell, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Joseph C. F. Clay, M.D. 
Leon Clemmer, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
James H. Clossen, 3rd, M.D. 
Earl B. Craig, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Pasquale Damiani, M.D. 
Thomas F. Doyle, M.D. 
Harry Evans, Jr., M.D. 
D. R. Ferguson, M.D., F.A.C.P. 
Gerald A. Fincke, M.D. 
H. Russell Fisher, M.D. 
Charles D. Fox, M.D. 
Edwin O. Geckeler, M.D. 



Fraiers in Facultate 

George D. Geckeler, M.D. 
James M. Godfrey, M.D. 
Carroll F. Haines, M.D. 
Edmund G. Hessert, M.D. 
N. Fulmer Hoffman, M.D. 
C. B. Hollis, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Donald T. Jones, M.D. 
Wayne T. Killian, M.D. 
Richard W. Larer, M.D. 
N. Volney Ludwick, M.D. 
Russell S. Magee. M.D. 
Russell K. Mattern, M.D. 
Carroll R. McClure, M.D. 
Joseph McEldowney, M.D. 
Raymond Moyer. M. D. 
Frank O. Nagle, M.D. 
George R. Neff, M.D, 



N. F. Paxson, M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Fred C. Peters. M.D. 
John H. Reading, M.D. 
Charles F. Rieger, M.D. 
Henry S. Ruth, M.D. 
James D. Schofield, M.D. 
E. R. Snader, M.D., F.A.C.P. 
H. Earl Twining, M.D 
Everett A. Tyler, M.D. 
Edward P. VanTine, M.D. 
Frederick J. von Rapp 
Thomas I. Visher. M.D. 
Harry S. Weaver, Jr., M.D. 
A. B. Webster. M.D., F.A.C.S. 
William W. Young, M.D. 
Arthur W. Waddington, M.D. 





a i am; 

PI UPSILON RHO 

VERTEBRA QUARTA 

President Eugene G. Mellies 

Vice President Reuben J. Dierwechter 

Secretary J acob \ Hladycz 

Corresponding Secretary Redmond B. J. Walsh 

Treasurer Thomas W. Tucker 




166 



Class of 1940 



John H. Abbott 
Reuben J. Dierwechter 



Herbert K. Goff 
Auton L. Merklin 



Eugene G. Mellies 
Thomas W. Tucker 



Joseph A. Concello 
William X. Gebele, Jr. 
Jacob J. Hladycz 
Frederick Ketcham 



Class of 1941 

Alfred A. Liberi 
Einar A. Palmgren, Jr. 
Robert A. Redcay 
Desidcrio A. V. Roman 



Willoughby J. Rothrock, Jr. 
Woodrow D. Schlosser 
Edward J. Simon 
Redmond B. J. Walsh 



Leonard A. Battafarano 
Daniel E. Boyle 
Charles A. Furey, Jr. 
John Robert Leo Hall 



Class of 1942 

Christian E. Moser 
Cornelius J. Regan 
Joseph M. Ragan 



Joseph B. Reilly 
Toyohiko J. Shiraishi 
George A. Sudimack 
Arthur T. Touzeau 



Toshio Ezaki 



Class of 1943 

Kermit K. Kistler 



Pomeroy E. Polevoy 



Dr. John V. Allen 
Dr. Leon T. Ashcraft 
Dr. William F. Baker 
Dr. Frank C. Benson, Jr. 
Dr. Ralph Bernstein 
Dr. James B. Bert 
Dr. Henry G. Blessing 
Dr. John A. Borneman 
Dr. Howard S. Busier 
Dr. Eugene F. Carpenter 
Dr. Hunter S. Cook 
Dr. Joseph R. Criswell 
Dr. Everett H. Dickinson 
Dr. H. M. Eberhard 
Dr. Grant O. Favorite 
Dr. Melville A. Goldsmith 
Dr. Nathan Griffith 



Fraters in Facultate 

Dr. William B. Griggs 
Dr. Joseph S. Hepburn 
Dr. Robert A. Hibbs 
Dr. H. F. Hoffman 
Dr. J. A. Honeff 
Dr. Francis M. James 
Dr. W. E. Kepler 
Dr. Dunne W. Kirby 
Dr. Jules J. Klain 
Dr. Henry I. Klopp 
Dr. A. E. Krick 
Dr. Charles F. Kutteroff 
Dr. Harry P. Landis 
Dr. Charles E. Lawson 
Dr. George Lorenz, Jr. 
Dr. Warren C. Mercer 
Dr. Paul A. Metzger 



Dr. M. F. Ondovchak 
Dr. Gilbert J. Palen 
Dr. Thomas W. Phillips 
Dr. Desiderio Roman 
Dr. Rowland Ricketts 
Dr. Albert R. Rihl 
Dr. George J. Rilling 
Dr. William G. Schmidt 
Dr. Thomas M. Snyder 
Dr. Henry L. Somers 
Dr. L. Thomas Sooy 
Dr. Leander P. Tori 
Dr. Gustave A. Van Lennep 
Dr. G. Harlan Wells 
Dr. Charles J. White 
Dr. Frank H. Widman 
Dr. Paul C. Wittman 



167 




PHI DELTA EPSILON 



BETA ZETA CHAPTER 




ri i 



Consul 

Vice Consul 

Scribe 

Chancellor . 



OFFICERS 

..Leon Glassman Senior Senator Milton Ackerman 

Martin D. Kissen Junior Senator Lennard L. Weber 

Saul D. Eger Historian Charles Block 

Jerome N. Baum Marshal Louis Magilner 



Class of 1940 

Milton Ackerman 
Leon Glassman 
Martin D. Kissen 
Lawrence J. Kopf 

Class of 1941 

Jerame N. Baum 
Saul D. Eger 
Charles L. Sacks 
Lennard L. Weber 



Class of 1942 

Bertram M. Bernstein 
Charles Block 
Donald Canter 
Morton Gutnick 
Louis Magilner 
Jack Mazor 
Walter Miller 
Hyman Rosenberg 
Herman Rosenstein 
Samuel S. Sverdlick 
Jerame L. Weinstock 



Class of 1943 

Richard Berman 
Morton R. Coane 
Edwin M. Cohn 
Arthur B. Coltman 
Herman Fischer 
Max R. Goldstein 
Martin B. Kassell 
Arthur Lipschutz 
Herman D. Rudnick 
Herman D. Stalpes 



Fraters in Facultate 

Herman J. Lubowitz, M.D. 



168 



PHI LAMBDA KAPPA 



ALPHA BETA CHAPTER 





OFFICERS 

Superior Maurice B. Gordon Scribe Leonard H. TaborofT 

Chancellor Leon M. Carp Treasurer Albert Rosner 



Class of 1940 
Leon M. Carp 
Maurice B. Gordon 
Sol Hammerman 
Jacob Krause 
Benjamin N. Litman 
John Sumers 

Class of 1941 
Sidney I. Brody 
Herman M. Goodman 
William L. Granatir 
Herbert S. Greenspan 
Ellis K. Hultzman 



Milton K. Kroungold 
Frank L. Miller 
Solomon S. Mintz 
Irving W. Robinson 
Albert Rosner 
Manning J. Rosnick 
Francis H. Stern 
Leonard H. Taboroff 

Class of 1942 

William K. Boros 
Israel E. Brownstein 
Nathan Crane 
Joseph Robinson 



Class of 1943 

Solomon L. Balin 
Harry L. Krieger 
Joseph R. Skyer 

Fraters in Facultate 

Dr. L. A. Frankel 
Dr. M. Fiterman 
Dr. W. Klinman 
Dr. L. S. Lipsitz 
Dr. J. W. Messey 
Dr. H. M. Sharkis 
Dr. W. S. Silverman 
Dr. H. L. Weinstock 



169 




LAMBDA PHI MU 




OFFICERS 



President John R. Amato 

Vice President Frank P. Tocci 

Secretary Anthony J. Minelli 

Corresponding Secy.Ernani V. M. DiMassa 



Treasurer August A. Ciotola 

Chaplain Joseph T. Cortese 

Historian Frank D. Minerva 

Sergeant-at Arms Joseph A. DeCaro 



Class of 1940 

John R. Amato 
Peter J. Cetta 
Augustine A. Ciotola 
Joseph T. Cortese 
Joseph A. DeCaro 
Ernani V. M. DiMassa 
Anthony J. Minelli 
Frank D. Minerva 
Dominic J. Pontarelli 
Frank P. Tocci 



Class of 1941 

Albert J. Battaglia 



Class of 1942 

Mario G. Cirelli 
Daniel J. Marino 
John G. Miele 
John J. Ranallo, Jr. 



Class of 1943 

John A. Alvin 
Frank A. DeDominicis 
Victor F. Grieco 
John Lepore 
Peter A. Petrone 



Froters in Facilitate 

A. DeBiacomo, M.D. 



170 



IL CIRCOLO ITALIANO 





OFFICERS 

President Philip A. Schifalacqua Secretary John J. Ranallo, Jr. 

Vice President Joseph A. Sciuto Treasurer Albert J. Battaglia 

Councellor Joseph A. DeCaro 



Class of 1940 

Joseph A. DeCaro 
Ernani V. M. DiMassa 
Dominic J. Pontarelli 
Philip A. Schifalacqua 
Joseph A. Sciuto 

Class of 1941 

Albert J. Battaglia 
Joseph A. Concello 
Gregory F. W. Froio 



Class of 1942 

Leonard A. Battafarano 
Armanno W. Ciccarelli 
Mario G. Cirelli 
Vincent P. DiRocco 
Nicholas DePiero 
Pasquale Guarini 
Daniel J. Marino 
John G. Miele 
John J. Ranallo 



Class of 1943 

Frank A. DeDominicis 
Nicholas J. A. Policarpo 
Harry C. Scarpa 

Fraters in Facultate 

P. G. Damiani. M.D. 
L. P. Tori. M.D. 
P. J. Gambescia, M.D. 
H. R. Giordano, M.D. 
A. L. Pierro, M.D. 




171 




NEWMAN CLUB 


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OFFICERS 

President George A. McCormack, Jr. Treasurer Fernando Canino-Pont 

Vice President Paul L. Flynn Recording Secretary. . .William R. Sollami 

Corresponding Sec'y. .Armanno Ciccarelli 



Class of 1941 

Albert F. Bozic 

Class of 1942 

Carlos E. Acevedo-Defillo 
Jose Aneses-Arrache 
Leonard A. Battafarano 
Daniel E. Black, Jr. 
Alfred S. Bogucki 
Daniel E. Boyle 
Andrew C. Brunhofer, Jr. 
Joseph A. Cassidy 
Gerald Mario Cirelli 
Julio E. Davilla-Boria 
Nicholas DePiero 
Robert W. Duffy 



Anthony A. Febraro 
Charles A. Furey 
John R. Hall 
John L. Kelly 
John E. Kram 
Edward I. Kraus 
Paul L. Krzywicki 
Hubert F. Manuzak 
Joseph T. Marconus 
Daniel J. Marino 
Daniel J. McCarron 
George A. McCormack, Jr 
Cornelius J. Regan 
Joseph B. Reilly 
Charles W. Ritter 
James J. Robinson 
Angel R. Rosario-Santos 



John T. Ross 
James G. Scanlon 
George A. Sudimack 
Leo J. Szary 

Class of 1943 

Harry J. Brumersky 
William A. Byrne 
Anthony M. Congello 
Frank A. DeDominicis 
John M. Duffy, Jr. 
John F. Fitzpatrick 
Leo B. Gallagher 
Robert F. Gibbons 
Norbert S. Gizinski 
John J. Gorman 



Charles J. Hely 
Jorge A. Hereter-Alvarez 
Mathew J. Jancsics, Jr. 
Albert J. Klimkevich 
William Lapihusko 
Joseph J. Leskin 
Jose F. Martinez-Funes 
Harry D. McAvoy 
William J. McHugh, Jr. 
Vladimir Mohnach 
William R. Sollami 
William F. Teskey 
Hiram Vazquez-Milan 
Arthur W. vonDeilen 
Eugene A. Wrona 
Albert J. Zogby 



172 



1 

J 




III 




Student Institute 




OFFICERS 

President Elmer E. Terrell 

Vice President Dominic J. Pontarelli 

Secretary Peter Paul Karpawich 

Treasurer Rowland B. Engle 

Class Representatives 

Class of 1940 Class of 1942 

Armand F. Verga John L. Kelly 

Russel P. Stoner Charles O. Tyler 

Class of 1941 Class of 1943 

Lewis A. Steinhilber Bede F. Howard 

Rudolph E. Warnecke Frank J. Frosch, Jr. 



176 



Glee Club 




OFFICERS 

Director Richard I. Darnell, '40 

Accompanist p aul L Krzywicki, '42 

Manager Carl A. Leyrer, '40 

Faculty Adviser Dr . Hunter S. Cook, '27 

First Tenor First Bass 

Robert A. Redcay, '41 Martin D. Kissen, '40 

Donald P. Bierne, '42 Frank D. Minerva, '40 

Joseph A. Cassidy, '42 Charles S. Yost, '41 

Hugh F. Luddecke, '42 Irving W. Robinson, '41 

Robert S. Oyer, '43 Charles Block, '42 

Louis Magilner, '42 
Jack Mazor, '42 
Martin B. Kassell, '43 



Second Tenor 

Joseph M. Faso, '40 
Sidney I. Brody, '41 
J. Robert Hart, '41 
Manning J. Rosnick, '41 
William K. Boros, '42 
Joseph Robinson, '42 
Arthur B. Coltman, '43 
Ernest H. Heydt, Jr., '43 



Second Bass 

Milton Ackerman, '40 
Joseph W. Ehrhart, '40 
Herbert S. Greenspan, '41 
Joseph W. Burnett, '42 
James C. Campbell, '42 
William C. Grasley, '43 
Henry A. Shields, '43 
Ian D. Murphy, '43 
Vladimir Mohnach, '43 



Orchestra 




Conductor 
Manager . 



William W. Leman, '41 
. Richard K. White, '41 



Violins 

George W. Laufenberg, '41 
William M. Kummer, '41 
George E. Covintree, '41 
Alfred C. B. Carter, '41 
Hugh F. Luddecke, '42 
Pomeroy E. Polevoy, '43 
Paul J. G. Grotzinger, '43 
Frank A. DeDominicis, '4 3 
Anthony M. Congello, '43 

Trumpets 

Donald R. Lovell, '41 
William H. Blanchard, '42 
Thomas L. Soss, '43 

Trombones 

Francis W. Brill, '41 
Clifford E. Laudenslager, '43 



Saxophones 

Walter F. Edmundson, '41 
William J. Campbell, '42 
Jesse Howard Swick, '42 

Clarinets 

Nathan Crane, '42 
John R. L. Hall, '42 
Lane Giddings, '43 
Eugene A. Wrona, '43 
William C. Grasley, '43 
Russel P. Poulsen, '43 

Tuba 

Alfred P. Leber, '41 

Piano 

Paul L. A. Kryzywicki, '42 

Drums 

Alexander A. Bolton, '41 



178 



Basketball Team 



o * 



O D 




Coach Henry H. Canton 

Captain Carl A. Leyrer 

Manager Franklin A. Bontempo 

Class of 1940 

Franklin A. Bontempo Peter Paul Karpawich 

Henry H. Canton Carl A. Leyrer 

Class of 1941 

Emerson B. Beery Alexander A. Bolton, Jr. 

Eugene H. Bekampis Kenneth K. Keown 

Class of 1942 

Andrew C. Brunhofer, Jr. Michael M. Etzl 

Charles E. Bryan Henry Leibundguth 

Hyman Rosenberg 

Class of 1943 

Herman D. Rudnick 




179 



Blue and Gold Ball 




OFFICERS 

Chairman Joseph F. Showers, Jr. 

Vice Chairman Everardo Goyanes 

Secretary Robert H. Linn 

Treasurer Peter Paul Karpawich 

Class of 1940 

Franklin A. Bontempo Carl A. Leyrer Joseph A. Sciuto 

Kenneth duBois Ervin Robert B. Marin William J. Shaughnessy 

Russel M. Evans Anthony J. Minelli John Sumers 

Joseph M. Faso Samuel A. Puma, Jr. Carl F. Tarlowski 

Martin D. Kissen Jules A. Riehs Thomas W. Tucker 

Bernard F. Leonard Carlos F. Rivera-Lugo Robert B. Zerbe 

Class of 1941 

Alexander A. Bolton Francis J. Lonergan 

William P. Britsch, Jr. Thomas H. Pennock 

Class of 1942 

Donald P. Beirne David W. Hughes 

George A. Sudimack 

Class of 1943 

Harry D. McAvoy Jacob G. Shade 



180 



Boericke Therapeutic Society 




OFFICERS 

President Richard I. Darnell 

Secretary Lawrence J. Kopf 

Faculty Adviser Dr. Garth W. Boericke 



Milton Ackerman 
Raymond W. Cronlund 
Richard I. Darnell 
Joseph M. Faso 
Herbert K. Goff 
Everardo Goyanes 
Martin D. Kissen 



Class of 1940 

Lawrence J. Kopf 
Carl A. Leyrer 
Dominic J. Pontarelli 
Carlos F. Rivera-Lugo 
James A. R. Rogers 
Russel P. Stoner 
John G. Strance 



Miguel A. Valiente-Carreno 



Nayip Fas-Fagundo 
J. Jacob Hladycz 
George E. Legg 
Francis J. Lonergan 
Stanley J. Okulicz 



Class of 1941 

Arnaldo Palmer 
A. Eaton Roberts 
Albert H. Them, Jr. 
Norman M. Warner 
Charles S. Yost 



181 



Reimann Oncologic Society 




OFFICERS 

President Joseph W. Ehrhart 

Vice President Eaton A. Roberts 

Secretary-Treasurer Lawrence J. Kopf 

Sponsor Stanley P. Reimann, M.D. 

Class of 1940 

Joseph W. Ehrhart Richard E. Lang 

Joseph M. Faso John L. Meyers 

George W. Harrison Joseph F. Showers 

Paul J. Herley Armand F. Verga 

Lawrence J. Kopf Robert B. Zerbe 

Class of 1941 

Amos E. Lenhert Eaton A. Roberts 

Alfred R. Richlan Willoughby J. Rothrock 

Lewis A. Steinhilber 

Class of 1942 

Joseph A. Cassidy John L. Kelly 

Thomas S. Jenike Daniel J. Marino 

Christian E. Moser 



132 



Van Lennep Surgical Society 




OFFICERS 

President Lee Pullen 

Vice President Frank A. Veri 

Secretary-Treasurer James A. R. Rogers 

Sponsor Gustave A. VanLennep, M.D. 

Honorary Members 

Dr. Charles P. Bailey Dr. Theodore C. Geary Dr. Wm. F. Rhienhoff, Jr. 

Members 



Hugh J. Burns 
William R. Clarkson 
Raymond W. Cronlund 
Reuben J. Dierwechter 
Kenneth duBois Ervin 



Class of 1940 

Herbert K. Goff 
Everardo Goyanes 
Maurice B. Gordon 
Alan R. Kannapel 
Carl A. Leyrer 



Jacob S. Ludwig 
D. O. Rojas-Daporta 
David B. Scanlon 
Elmer E. Terrell 
Armand F. Verga 



Alexander A. Bolton 
Fernando L. Buxeda 
James R. Hart 
Francis J. Kelly 
George E. Legg 



Class of 1941 

Amos E. Lenhert 
Sigmund J. Makarchek 
Venzel R. Mikan 
Thomas H. Pennock 
William C. Piver 



Alfred R. Richlan 
Irving W. Robinson 
Desiderio A. Roman-Vega 

Albert H. Them, Jr. 
Norman M. Warner 



183 



Undergraduate Society 




OFFICERS 

President Kenneth duBois Ervin 

Corresponding Secretary Eugene G. Mellies 

Faculty Sponsor Dr. William W. Young 



Members 



William R. Clarkson 
Stephen Derkach 
Harold H. Evans 
Russell M. Evans 
Pattison Fulton 
Herbert K. Goff, Jr. 



Everardo Goyanes 
Charles W. Hoyt 
Eugene G. Mellies 
James A. R. Rogers 
Elmer E. Terrel 
Thomas W. Tucker 



Armand F. Verga 



184 



Clinico-Pathologic Society 




OFFICERS 



President 
Sponsor . 



William J. Shaughnessy 
. . H. Russel Fisher, M.D. 



Members 



Class of 1940 

Peter P. Karpawich 
Richard E. Lang 
John L. Meyers 
Samuel J. Puma 
Frank H. Stegura 
Paul T. Souliotis 
Carl F. Tarlowski 
Armand F. Verga 
Frank A. Veri 



Class of 1941 

Francis W. Brill 
Joseph K. Harrop 
James R. Hart 
Francis J. Kelly, Jr. 
Robert J. Lavoie 
Sigmund J. Makarchek 
William A. Mclntyre 
William A. O'Hara 
Alfred R. Richlan 
Alfred E. Roberts 



185 



Club Nineteen 




Members 



Franklin A. Bontempo 
Carl F. Buechle 
Hugh J. Burns 
Henry H. Canton 
Joseph W. Ehrhart 
Harold H. Evans 



Russel M. Evans 
Carl A. Leyrer 
Joseph F. Showers 
John C. Sutton 
Elmer E. Terrel 
Armand F. Verga 



Alfred R. Richlan 



185 



Craig Gynecologic Society 




President Amos E. Lenhert 

Vice President Bernard W. Pechan 

Secretary Karl H. Ziegenhorn 

Sponsor Earl B. Craig, M.D. 

Members 

Walter F. Edmunson 
Alfred W. Erb 
Amos E. Lenhert 
Robert H. Linn 
Bernard W. Pechan 
Lewis A. Steinhilber 
Karl H. Ziegenhorn 






187 



Circulo Hispanoamericano 



, .-. 




HUH 



Class of 1940 



Lorenzo Arsuaga 
Francisco Berio Suarez 
Angel Roberto Buxeda 
Everardo Goyanes 



Carlos Rivera Lugo 
Dulcidio Rojas Daporta 
Ulises Lopez Sanabria 
Miguel A. Valiente 



Fernando L. Buxeda 
Angel Benicio Colon 
Nayip Fas Fagundo 



Kenneth Ramirez Smith 

Class of 1941 

Wilbert Hernandez Camara 
Arnaldo Palmer 
Desiderio A. Roman 



Carlos E. Acevedo 
Jose Aneses-Arrache 
Fernando Canino Pont 



Class of 1942 

Julio E. Davila 



Angel R. Rosario Santos 
Sarkin M. Mudafort 



Jorge Hereter 
Jose Martinez 



Class of 1943 



Ian D. Murphy 
Hiram Vanzquez 



188 




In recognition of 
fifty years of 

devoted service 

to 

Hahnemann 



we pause to 
salute 

§ 

DR. FRANK C. BENSON, JR. 



189 



-C^5 





u 



MILTON ACKERMAN 
Editor-inChief 



Managing Editor Louis A. Cerulli 

Assistant Managing Editor Paul J. Herley 

Assistant Managing Editor Herbert K. Goff 

Society Editor John C. Sutton, Jr. 

Art Editor Everardo Goyanes 

Humor Editor Frank D. Minerva 

Photography Editor Reuben J. Dierwechter 

Faculty Editor John L. Meyers 

Underclass Editor Vincent F. Amar 

General Editorial Staff 

William P. Bradley, Jr. Richard E. Lang 

Carl F. Buechle Hugh J. Lenahan 

William T. Corey Jacob S. Ludwig 

Thomas R. Counihan Eugene G. Mellies 

Charles W. Hoyt Wallace W. Munsie 

Lawrence J. Kopf Joseph J. Pendola 

David B. Scanlan Albert F. Parker 

Frank A. Serena Frank P. Tocci 
Joseph L. Witkowski 

Executive Editorial Staff 



CERULLI 



GOFF 



HERLEY 



SUTTON 









FRANK A. VERI 
Business Manager 



Assistant Business Manager Paul T. Souliotis 

Assistant Business Manager Miguel A. Valiente-Carreno 

Advertising Manager Franklin K. Nelk 

Circulation Manager Ernest J. Benko 



General Business Staif 



Edward R. Aberant 
Anton L. Merklin 
Edward W. Mulligan 
Lee Pullen 
Phillip A. Schifalacqua 



Benjamin F. Streets 
Frank H. Stegura 
Gene C. Strauss 
William H. Rogers 
Charles W. Weber 



Executive Business Staff 



Valiente-Carreno 



Nelk 



Benko 



Souliotis 





Business 
Staff 




MEDIC 

FACULTY 

ADVISERS 




CARL C. FISCHER, M.D. 




RUSSEL H. FISHER, M.D. 




193 




- -> 



< 



& 




III 




III 



MEDIC 




THE SENIOR CLASS 

of 
Hahnemann Medical College 

LETS DOWN ITS 
HAIR WITH 

THE MANIC 

OF 

1940 



196 




He who knows not, and knows that he knows not. 

Is a Freshman — poor fellow 
He who knows, and knows not that he knows, 

Is a Sophomore — and he'll probably forget it 
He who knows, and knows that he knows, 

Is a Junior — and that's what he thinks 
He who knows not, and knows not that he knows not 

Is a enior — and he'd better watch out 
for the Medical Council. 



As you, the members of the Class of 1940, embark upon your medical 
careers, the world lies in chaos about you (but they haven't seen any- 
thing yet). It therefore behooves you, as physicians, to not only concern 
yourselves with the healing of the poor benighted individuals who pre- 
sent themselves to you (mostly your wife's relatives), but also in a larger 
measure with the healing of the evils which beset the world about you — 
for both of these I strongly recommend the indicated remedy in the 12X 
potency. 

Only the other day, I had lunch with a very excellent gentleman, un- 
fortunately a graduate of this institution, who bemoaned the fact that the 
young physicians one meets today see far more beauty in the engraving 
on a ten dollar bill, than they do in a perfectly executed tenth-normal 
equivalent. This was, I sorrowfully admitted, a true statement — and just 
between you and me — a damn good idea. I hastened to assure him, how- 
ever, that the men of the Class of 1940 were not of a type that would over- 
ly concern themselves with the beauties of ten dollar bills — especially if 
anyone had a twenty handy. 

So, as you go forth, armed with naught but your diploma (only one 
to a customer), to find your niche in life, I would like to leave this mes- 
sage with you (and where you leave it is your own business). Fight hard, 
fight fair, vote Republi — (oops, wrong pep talk), be loyal to your school 
(you may want to get your brother in some day), and be sooner caught in 
public without your trousers — than without your handy pocket case and 
its four hundred and thirty-nine (1930 Census figures) useful remedies. 

Very hazily yours. 

WILLIAM A. VON SMITH 
Dean and Executive Vice-President 
Men's Acute Building 
Allentown State Hospital 



1940 



197 



MEDIC 



SENIORS 



Editor's Note: A Senior section with out pictures is like Strance without 
Strauss, but this senior section is not going to have any individual pictures 
because: 

1. We'd have to talk George Engelhard into paying the 
sitting fee again. 

2. We'd again have to convince Amar, and Cavalli, and 
Shaughnessy, and a half-dozen others that they really 
DO look like that. 

3. Lastly — look at the results from the pictures that were 
taken. 

So, in order to save ourselves all this woe, we will resort to a device with 
which some of you are no doubt familiar, and make it . . . 



The Last Roll Call 



ABBOTT — who had better stay away from the post-mortem rooms next year 
lest some undertaker mistake that lethargy for true rigor mortis. 

ABERANT — Snuffy sits in the back at all the lectures to save the profs the 
trouble of looking over his head. 

ACKERMAN — who seemed to be having a lot more fun with the year-book 
secretary, than he was having with the year-book. 

AMAR — who checked out of chem lab with only the wire gauze left in his 
locker — he couldn't break that. 

AMATO — John was, undoubtedly, Greene Street's most promising rectal 
specialist. 

ARSUAGA — It got so bad with Larry handling the phone, that Dr. Bernstein 
was afraid to call the dispensary. 

BEGENAU — whose rat races either ended up with three nurses and three hun- 
dred students, or vice versa. 




198 




BENEDETTI — whose only competitor for pediatrics samples was Minelli, until 
Sciuto started laying away supplies for coming events. 

BENKO — "Well, I have a case down at Broad Street Hospital now, Doctor ". 



BERIO-SUAREZ — who with one hot pair of dice, broke several morales, to soy- 
nothing of a few medical students, at Allentown. 

BOBECK — somehow or other, he even escaped the eagle eye of Dr. Bernstein. 

BOLINGER — a couple of times, we thought they were going to have to call in 
the engineers to extract Bolly from one of those seats he got tangled up in. 

BONTEMPO— "hand me another dart, and this time I'll hit the board." 

BRADLEY — he reached the point where he was slicing meat so thin for Pop 
Dion, that Dr. Sappington sent the tissue room technicians down to watch 
his technique. 

BUECHLE — no matter how noisy the class, there was always a hush right 
before they hit Beak's name on the roll. 

BURNS — who spent the first two years developing the art of making fine paper- 
wads, only to see them replaced by BB shot in the Junior year. 

BUXEDA — Alice in Wonderland — the South American way. 

CANTON — who could do more tricks with a rolled-up surgical gown, than 
Hubbell could do with a baseball, but couldn't get the Dean to install 
pari-mutuels. 

CARP — the only patients in whom he couldn't find endocrinopathies were Dr. 
Klopp's — but then, we were only in Allentown a week. 

CAVALLI — a roaring voice, which came to class only to argue with Cerulli. 

CERULLI — the gyn patients all wanted to be treated by that fellow who looked 
like Edward G. Robinson. 

CETTA — the Kings Kounty Kid was really disappointed when he discovered 
just where babies did come from during that Junior internship. 

CIOTOLA — Augie found that the pleasantest way to make ward rounds at 
Allentown, was to follow the nurses. 



1940 



199 



MEDIC 



CLARKSON — he supplied the cigarettes for four years — and Engelhard sup- 
plied the habit. 

COREY — some of those conversations may have made sense to the patients 
at Woodville, but 

CORTESE — it seems that the only reason he ever ventured into the hospital, 
was to look for Cetta and Ciotola. 

COUNIHAN — the guy who even hod Dr. Lafferty bewildered — he'll probably 
end up by giving the state board examiners a quizz. 

CRONLUND — an introitus which would take the largest speculum the gyn dis- 
pensary could supply, was still a little too small to admit one of his fingers. 

DARNELL — the front row's foremost citizen didn't know what to do with his 
hands, when the profs said — "You needn't take notes on this". 

D E CARO — the patients at Allentown got a break, when the school sent Joe 
up for them to see. 

DERKACH — Steve was going to get his year-book by the middle of May, if we 
had to shove it down his throat. 

D1ERWECHTER — a right rectus incision started at the costal margin at one end, 
and usually ended up with Rube and his candid camera at the other end. 

D!MASSA — the boys always knew that the lecture hour was approximately 
one-fourth finished when Ernie came in. 

EHRHART — to whom we are also going to deliver a year-book personally, and 
not via the throat. 

ELCANESS — the only thing that pleased Elky in four years was — you guessed 
it — Elcaness. 

ENGLEHARD — so George took out a pack of cigarettes — and fifty-three Seniors 
fainted. 

ENGLE — we'll never know whether or not he carried Verga across the threshold 
at Allentown. 

ERVIN — they had to keep Cutey out of the Pediatrics Wards for fear that some- 
one would slap him into a bed. 

EVANS, H. — whose tenure as social chairman for the "Daughters of Israel" 
was short but highly successful. 








5V» 



200 




EVANS, R. — we thought he was spending so much time in the amphitheatre 
because he was interested in surgery. 

FASO — one of the original Y. M. C. A. boys who managed to "fenagle" through. 

FULTON — they called Pat T. B. — and they didn't mean Koch — they meant three 
beers. 

GLASSMAN — Leo started worrying in Medical Terminology — and was still at 
it the day they handed us our diplomas. 

GOFF — who managed to sandwich a medical education in between trips to 
Pittsburgh. 

GORDON — Dr. Snyder was going to sue him for plagiarism after he graded 
that first histology exam. 

GOYANNES — they were setting their clocks by Ev at the Gladstone, when he 
passed through the lobby on his way to school, they knew it was noon. 

GREIDER — Les was two steps ahead of the class when ti came to knowing 
about the care and feeding of infants. 

GROSS — after a while, the class got tired of singing "We're a bunch of ", 

but nobody could convince Gross of the fact. 

GRUBER — the standard technique for preparing the operative field in any of the 
surgical clinics always included getting Bill out of the way. 

HAIN — the farm's loss is our Hain. 

HAMMERMAN — who intended to get his tuitions worth if he had to kill every 
dispensary patient in the place. 

HARRISON — swing and sway — the Tavern way — any Friday night. 

HENDRICKSON — refrected by every optholmologist on the staff, and the dart 
board still wasn't any easier to hit. 

HERLEY — one of the front row reflectors that helped to get the light to the back 
of the room. 

HOLLAND — the cockroach population of Minnesota is literally trembling in its 
boots. 

HOPPING — the poker games at Allentown were a lot tougher than the heart 
games in Hering Hall. 

HOYT — the Major didn't expect us to believe those stories, but the least we 
could do was listen to them. 



1940 



201 



MEDIC 



HUMMEL — Napoleon had his Waterloo, but all Fritz did was call the roll once 
in the Sophomore year. 

KANNAPEL--A1 was well in the running in the collegiate clothes competition 
until McDonough showed up in that green jacket. 

KARPAWICH — the only nurse he didn't call by first name wos Miss Lysle — 
and she didn't hang out in the Luncheonette. 

KISSEN — the boys were quite sure that the editor of the class newspaper was 
smoking lochia pads in that pipe of his. 

KOPF — who became so expert, that he could play Yankee Doodle on the pin- 
ball machine in the Luncehonette. 

KRAUSE — who was always the dispensary chief until examination day rolled 
around. 

LANG — a most even-tempered fellow — always griping. 

LENAHAN — who spent so much time in Orthopedics dispensary in his Junior 
year that people thought he was one of the fixtures. 

LENOCI — who "Mae'd" his way through medical school without selling maga- 
zine subscriptions. 

LEONARD — "Now the way we play at the firehouse". 

LEYRER — and what will the "Blonde Bombshell" do now? 

LITMAN — he's looking for a rotating internship that includes three months for 
worrying. 

LOFTUS — inasmuch as this is the last roll call, let's make it an unusual one, 
and write down for Johnny — present. 

LUDWIG — the demon pharmacist who spent four years with Sumers, Meltzer, 
and Oiler trying to get a word in edgewise. 

MARIN — the suregon had two assistants but all the anaesthetist had was 
Marin. 

M c DONOUGH — we wern't sure whether the Brown Prep students were coming 
over to see the latest thing that Mac was wearing, or to watch operations. 




202 




MELLIES — Red was a handy man to have on an anatomy table when Dr. 
Kuemmel dropped around because when those two started talking cameras 
— the Doc forgot all about quizzing. 

MELTZER — we might have known that Meltzer and Oiler would take an intern- 
ship together — they've been talking steadily for four years now and there 
is still so much to be said. 

MERKLIN — we don't know how he does it — but you could set Tony down in 
the middle of wildest Siberia, and the betting would be even that he'd 
have the telephone numbers of a dozen blondes inside of twenty-four 
hours. 

MEYERS — we never did believe the rumor that they had to furnish a room at 
the Americus just like the Alumni office before they could get Johnny to 
move in. 

MILICI — nobody envied him his roommate. Poor John! 

MILNAMOW — we'd like to be around for the fun when he starts to pass out 
those "nuggets" on his state board exams. 

MINELLI — he and Minerva weren't seeing enough of the patients in G-U dis- 
pensary, so that used to follow them up in that Race Street poolroom. 

MINERVA — the Alabama flash wit da Brooklyn accent will probably be heck- 
ling the speaker on graduation day — he hasn't missed anyone yet. 

MULLIGAN — that smile that Mulligan is wearing these days probably means 
that a joke someone told him back in the Sophomore year finally did bore 
its way in there. 

MUNSIE — the first herald of a warm spring would be Wallie stripped down to 
his undershirt in the air-conditioned (?) lecture rooms. 

MURPHY — the man who — always had a little stuff lined up, quit wearing that 
"iron Kelly" the day a freshman asked him for his autograph. 

NELK — the chief reason our advertising manager didn't get to a lot of those 
lectures was because he didn't know where Room C was. 

OLLER — we never could figure out how he managed to keep up a running-fire 
conversation with Meltzer, play Ghost with Glassman, and take lecture 
notes all at once. 



1940 



203 



MEDIC 



PARKER — who has enough candid camera evidence on most of the boys to 
enable him to live the comfortable life of a blackmailer for the rest of his 
days. 

PENDOLA — whom the boys dubbed — "The pregnant penguin from Brooklyn" — 
but there couldn't be a fundus that would go that high. 

PONTARELLI — after four years of sitting between Meltzer and Oiler during 
lectures, the only place Ponty could intern where he would feel at home 
would be a boiler factory. 

PULLEN — Lee didn't care whether he graduated cum laude or not — all he 
wanted to do was beat Weber just once in a twenty-five point game. 

PUMA — Sam still claims that it was the fine print of those Sophorome bacter- 
iology notes which spoiled his batting eye. 

PUPEK — who is bound to become a cardiologist, since he's been fixing "tickers" 
for years. 

RAMIREZ-SMITH — who was one of Murphy's original "Gitchy-gitchies". 

RIEHS — and there wasn't a better "three whites" shooter in the class. 

RIVERA-LUGO — Carlos was the only lad in the class who could talk party with 
"the Duchess" — and he made the most of it. 




ROGERS, J. — we didn't recognize Jim for the first couple of weeks, with that 
new name, but it all came back the minute we saw him with his hand on 
a prof's shoulder — buzing in his ear in that old Rogokos manner. 

ROGERS, W. — he didn't mind dropping down one place on the roll, but he 
did get a little sore when his "brother" thought their grades were mixed. 

ROJAS-DAPORTA — they're going to have to give him a twenty-four sheet bill- 
board on graduation day because they won't be able to get all that name 
on one diploma. 

SANABRIA — somehow it's easier to picture Ulyses sitting by a fireside, decked 
out in a shawl and lace cap, knitting socks, than it is to picture him 
amongst all those great big burly med students. 

SCANLAN — we often wondered whether or not Dave just didn't want to take 
notes, or whether he never had a fountain-pen or pencil. 

SCHARF — Pasteur and Koch and all the rest were certainly lucky that the man 
with the face like the Jolly-Boy kite ads wasn't born a couple of centuries 
sooner — according to Scharf. 

SCHIFALACOUA— Tsk, tsk, tsk— such an insult to Culbertson. 

SCIUTO — he took such an awful lot from the sixth floor. 

SERENA — who was so full of hot air that they wanted to assign a couple of 
N. Y. A. boys to act as his ground crew. 

SHAUGHNESSY — and of course nobody ever dreamed that he was Irish until 
he showed up in that green necktie on St. Patrick's day this year. 

SHORE — Sid was never quite sure just where that sciatic nerve did go to, but 
then Dr. Phillips never asked him the odds on the Oshkosh Tech — Mineola 
Aggies football game, either. 

SHOWERS — Shadow wanted to know what those guys wanted for four bucks 
a couple — the Minneapolis Symphony! 

SMERZNAK — one of de boys dat wuz in de know! 

SPAGNUOLO — they had to convince Pete that it wasn't a diabolic plot to get 
him in wrong with the faculty, before they could even get him to play 
the piano. 

STONER — if the other two people in Mt. Joy are that quiet, the silence must be 
ominous when Russ goes home for a vacation. 

STEGURA — We're not quite sure how a barber pole is going to look with 
M.D. painted on it. 

STRANCE — Hurrah for the western spaces 

The home of the wheat and the corn 
STRAUSS — Where the Strauss's look only at Strances 

And the Strances look only with scorn. 

STREETS — Ben worried that hair-line back at least two inches over the four- 
year period, but the waist-line didn't keep up the pace. 

SOULIOTIS — our nomination for the best trick of the decade was Paul's going 
through four years at Hahnemann before discovering that his last name 
was one letter shy. 

SUMERS — it wasn't the mustache that annoyed the boys so much, it was just 
some of the words he used to strain through it, that got their goat. 



1940 



205 



MEDIC 



SUTTON — any barroom in town was willing to offer a southpaw dart-shooter a 
contract, but Big John couldn't see any future in it, so he stuck to Hering 
Hall. 

TARLOWSKI — who brings back to mind that old adage about — "Be true to 
your teeth or else they'll be false to you". 

TELGE — the Black Turk had political aspirations for three years, but the 
closest he ever got was serving sandwiches to Verga in the Luncheonette. 

TERRELL — and if Terrel hadn't been elected president of Student Institute he 
could have very easily taken that army of Sigs and gone off and started 
his own medical school. 

TOCCI — if he hadn't dragged down that internship in Harlem Hospital, his 
next best bet would have been the chair (or soap-box) of forensic medicine 
in Columbus Circle. 

TUCKER — and if only Tommy hadn't run out of toilet tissue, that Allentown 
streetcar we were on would have won first prize in any float parade in 
the country. 




VALIENTE-CARRENA — we were certain that the Revenue Department would 
get around to making Mike take out a license for that bar in the Gladstone 
before the year was up. 

VERGA — we don't know whether the A. M. A. elects its presidents by popular 
vote or not, but if they do, we'll give even money that Mr. Moto will be 
the president in a couple of years — either that, or he'll have Hague working 
for him. 

VERI — and if the advertisers won't pay for their ads — we'll just send Frank 
out to play poker with them to collect the money, and their shirts as well. 

WEBER — Old Man Mose is going to get his electrical engineering mixed up 
with his doctoring some day — and wire some poor patient for sound. 

WINNER — the only thing his Sophomore election platform lacked was a copy of 
his date-book — and if he'd thrown that in, his ticket would have walked in. 

WITKOWSKI — the ten o'clock scholar started coming in at nine because he 
got tired of eating breakfast so close to lunch. 

ZERBE — we always envied Bob — he was the only fellow who could come in 
anywhere during a roll call and still get marked present — but it must have 
been a terrific struggle to keep from developing an inferiority complex 
after being last in everything. 

And so ends the last roll call, which was all in good fun — but if there are 
any hard feelings — blame it on — 

Minerva, Munsie, and Ackerman. 




207 



1940 



MEDIC ^^^^^^^^^= 
Handbook of Dispensary Medicine 

A compilation of handy little facts and pointers calculated to advise those 
classes following us, and those twelve seniors who are going to repeat the 
year (11:00 P. M. rumor 5/1/40) how best to enjoy the hours between one and 
three. 

MEDICAL DISPENSARY — a cozy little madhouse occupying the southeast cor- 
ner of the first floor wheer junior staff members drop in to get warm, cadge 
cigarettees from one another, and tell tall tales about the size of the patient 
who got away; and where senior students play a game called "button — button, 
who has the B.M.R. request" with a red-headed lady who was certain that that 
pateint wasn't Irish even if the name on his card was Michael O'Rourke. Our 
advice for getting along here is: 

1. Don't spend a half-hour trying to find the clinic card of that good 
looking blonde you saw on the bench on the way in — she is probably 
one of Dr. Snowden's allergy patients. 

2. Refer all undiagnosable patients to G-I dispensary — but DON'T give 
them an appointment for the day that you are assigned to that dis- 
pensary. 

3. It is customary to send Miss Whelan flowers and a box of candy before 
requesting a chest plate for a patient. If, after this, she still wants to 
know what you want the request for — you had better give up and 
refer the patient to Neurology. 

4. Shy away from a folder containing ten or twenty cards — it probably 
belongs to a diabetic who has been receiving insulin from Dr. Gold- 
smith ever since the doctor was high enough to reach an arm with a 
syringe. Such patients will insist on taking up your time with tales 
of how much better the dispensary was in the old hospital. 

5. Don't worry about the pharmacy — they always keep a five-ton supply 
of phenobarbital in reserve. 

6. After getting three different answers from three different staff men 
concerning the indicated remedy for a case — give the patient Bryonia 
and you can't go wrong. 

G-I DISPENSARY — this dispensary is dedicated to the proposition that any 
patient who doesn't have a rubber tube shoved down his gullet at least once 
a week is the unhappiest of mortals and probably a nasty Communist to boot. 

1. In this dispensary, all the patients get "the works"; "the works" con- 
sisting of the draining of everything from the cavities in the back 
molars down to the goblet cells just north of the ligament of Trite. 
This is all performed by means of a rubber tube with a gagging patient 
on one end and a harried technician on the other. 

2. In interpreting a gall-bladder drainage report, the finding of the fol- 
lowing should be considered pathologic: (a) goldfish, (b) old hairpins, 
and (c) cigarette butts. 

3. If you can't blame it on the gall-bladder — remember — you can always 
fall back on Habitus Enteropticus — where the ensiform is more than a 
stone's throw from the symphisis. 

4. The best way to confuse a peptic ulcer pain that comes on three hours 
after a meal is to have the patient eat his meals three hours later than 
usual. 



208 



THERAPEUTICS— in which Drs. Boericke, Snowden, and Mattern carry the 
gospel of Samuel Hahnemann to the darkest regions of the sixth floor, and 
also to see how well the students assigned to the various cases on the floor 
have copied the interns' histories and physicians. Things to keep in mind in 
this section are: 

1. Always stay as far away from the bedside as possible because — 

(a) This gives you more time to find out from your partner whether 
or not the case is yours when Dr. Boericke says, "Now whose 
case is this?" 

(b) You can step out and chew the fat with a nurse while the doctors 
are deciding whether to give the patient Pulsatilla or Iodine. 

(c) Some of the diseases they get on that service are awfully con- 

tagious. 

2. After the indicated remedy has been suggested by Dr. Boericke, it 
must be moved and seconded by Drs. Mattern and Snowden before it 
becomes a statute. 

3. You can have a lot of fun with the X-Ray department by giving them 
the history on one case and the x-ray plates on another case to in- 
terpret at the Friday afternoon seminars. 

4. Some good excuses for uncompleted histories and physicals — the 
patient was uncooperative, the patient was on the bedpan, the patient 
was in coma, and last but not least — the intern hadn't done a history 
and physical yet. 

5. When confronted with a patient on whom you knew you were sup- 
posed to have taken a history two weeks previously, act indignant and 
blame the intern for failing to assign the case to you, if this doesn'f 
work — say you were waiting for the symptoms to develop. 



PEDIATRICS DISPENSARY— this dispensary is split into two divisions— the sick 
baby division, and the well baby division; the chief difference between the two 
being that in the sick baby division, they put you in a booth with a single- 
baby — and you only have to watch out for ONE stream at a time. It is prac- 
tically impossible to go through three weeks of this dispensary unsullied (and 
we mean unsullied) — but here are some tips anyway: 

1. Never attempt to carry a baby to the scales for weighing — you never 
can tell when those things are loaded. 

2. Always try to get the cards of babies who are on the breast — you 
don't have to worry about figuring out a formula for one of those things. 

3. Never give any of those samples to the patients — do you want the 
babies of the married students in the class to starve! 

4. The recommended method for getting a tongue depresser into a baby's 
mouth is to dislocate its jaw first. 

5. Never try to strap an umbilical hernia without four assistants — two to 
hold the baby — and two to untangle you from the adhesive tape — while 
one of the staff men is strapping it. 

NEUROLOGY DISPENSARY— a veritable bee-hive of a dispensary where the 
students sit around playing a game titled — "Who put the positive spinal Was- 
serman in Uncle Jake's moustache cup". The only way you can enjoy this 
dispensary is to break a leg and miss the three weeks — but here are some 
pointers anyway: 

1 . The first thing to do when one of the staff walks in the room is to make 
sure that the neurology book you are studying so intently is not upside 
down. 



1940 



209 



MEDIC 



2. Don't be surprised if Wally Kratz comes in to give a lecture on some- 
thing nearly every one else gives some sort of lecture in this dispensary. 

3. We advise taking the notes on homeopathic drugs used in neurology 
on colored note paper if it can be obtained. It makes excellent confetti 
at Mummer's parades and other gala occasions. 

4. Don't waste too much time on the cases assigned to you in the wards — 
they will probably be discharged before Friday clinic anyway — YOU 
HOPE. 

5. And if you miss the P.G.H. section on Mondays — you can always claim 
that you mistook the Stanley Theatre for the psychiatric building. 

DERMATOLOGY DISPENSARY— the answer to the problem of how you can 
keep a student entertained and cram a little knowledge into him at the same 
time, or Ringling Brothers, Bernsteins and Wittmans mammoth show featuring 
that galloping dermatologist — Dr. Kleinguenther. 

1. A handy method for telling the day of the week — on Tuesdays the 
Professor wears a brown suit, Wednesdays a grey one, Thursdays a 
black one, and Fridays a blue one — on Saturdays, Sundays, and Mon- 
days — the Professor stays home while these suits are out being cleaned 
and pressed. 

2. To become a doctor — you must know the following: 

(a) The Professor's baldness is PREMATURE (because in the old 
days — they didn't have such conveniences as automobiles, elec- 
tric lights, and — Bernstein's Hair Tonic). 

(b) There is some drug in a 500x potency — because you can't destroy 
matter (but you can make it damn inconspicuous). 

3. The Professor believes in the use of high potencis in practically all 
drugs except malt, hops, rye, or corn extracts which he prefers in 
physiologic doses. 

4. Statistics show that of the three hundred and twenty-eight students 
who have been awarded the rope in the Profesor's fifty years of teach- 
ing experience — three became Presidents, one won the Kentucky Derby, 
nine are doing the Indian rope trick in various carnivals, and the rest 
are prescribing Dermament for all their skin cases. 

5. When stuck for the indicated remedy — remember: you don't go up an 
alley just to take a short-cut home; canaries don't crow; and if the 
bank clerks are using fountain pens — you still have some in your 
pencil. 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT DISPENSARY— wherein the boys get a gander 
at a retina, an ear drum, a turbinate, and a tonsil; and thus, having absorbed 
the essentials of these difficult specialties spend the rest of the time in the 
second floor students' room recuperating from the strain. To pass the time 
away — here are a couple of "nuggets": 

1. Never try to argue with your head mirror — if you find the light focused 
on the eye — treat it; if focused on the nose — get a speculum in there 
before the light — or the nose — gets away; if focused in the larynx and 
you catch a glimpse of something red between the two pillars — you 
have the prime indication for a T. & A. If you can't get the light any- 
where near the head — better refer the patient to another dispensary. 

2. When syringing an ear — you can be certain that you are using too 
much pressure when the water starts coming out the other ear. 

3. If you see sebaceous glands — that is not a retina you are looking at, 
but the side of the patients nose. 



r.O 



4. It is recommended that the senior students have a working knowledge 
of the alphabet before attempting to test a patient's vision on the 
charts. 

5. When using a laryngeal mirror on a pateint — stop when any of the 
following happens: 

(a) the patient deposits his lunch in your lap. 
(b) the patient becomes cyanotic and stops breathing, 
(c) you withdraw the mirror and find pieces of vocal cord hanging 
from it. 

GYNECOLOGY DISPENSARY— an assorted collection of backaches and leuk- 
orrheas subsidized by the Vinegar Manufacturers Association where the gals 
learn that that thick white discharge ain't whipped cream and the students 
learn that the gals aren't "sugar and spice, and everything nice". 

1. Don't try to get all the fresh looking young white girls for patients — 
because in three weeks — you can become a confirmed cynic. 

2. If you can't feel a fornice in any direction — you are probably in the 
bladder. 

3. Make sure that the patient sees that it is a speculum you are inserting 
because some of them will insist that you are trying to shove a sink 
up there. 

4. When, in the course of an examination, a patient complains that she 
is feeling nervous — get that thumb away from there. 

5. Simplified treatment — (a) all patients get vinegar douches, (b) alternate 
patients get hydrastis or cantharis, (c) every other patient gets dia- 
thermy, (d) every fifth patient gets estrogenic substance, (e) at the end 
of the day — a drawing is held of the patient's clinic numbers and the 
winner gets a bilateral salpingo-oopherectomy. 

OBSTETRICS DISPENSARY — a place where thirteen year old primiparas sit 
around walking with twenty-five year old para twelves while the students 
finish their cigarettes in the students' room. 

1. The internal conpugate shall be considered as the distance from the 
symphis to the point where the patient yells ouch. When you have 
your entire arm in there and still can't feel the lumbar spine — put down 
eleven centimeters — and forget about it — because the patient could 
probably deliver a Mack Truck through there. 

2. A marked rise in the systolic pressure means: (a) someone has prob- 
ably stuffed your stethoscope diaphragm with paper, (b) you've put 
the blood pressure cuff on your own arm by mistake, or (c) the student 
who took the previous reading was in a hurry to get back and retrieve 
his cigar butt in the students room. 

3. We don't care how thirsty you are — that stuff you find lying around in 
various places in paper cups is NOT lemonade! 

4. In a patient pregnant over six months — the following are absolutely 
necessary for a vaginal exam: (a) A vagina; (b) a foetus. The only 
contra-indication is the presence of Dr. Lafferty. 

5. Whe ntaking the internal measurements on a para ten it is best to have 
one foot anchored to a radiator or some other stationary object. 

6. The social service workers have been in this dispensary a long time 
and are pretty much disillusioned about the stork and such — so don't 
worry if you can't embarass them. 



= 1940 



MEDIC 



SURGICAL DISPENSARY — the curriculum provides this dispensary as a place 
for students to go after they have finished reading the morning paper in surgery 
clinic, and also where they may learn to do things which any Boy Scout could 
do with much less fuss. 

1. The duties of a student assisting at a sebaceous cyst removal are: 
(a) To hold the patient's coat, (b) To move the light around for the staff 
man, (c) To keep out of the staff man's way. 

2. A bandage or dressing can be considered as correctly applied when 
you are able to get the patient out of the dispensary before Dr. Buck 
sees it. 

3. Hemostats which stay closed, and forceps that grip are to be turned 
over to the dispensary nurse when discovered, as they are not meant 
for student use. 

4. For a small laceration on a finger, bandage the entire arm and put it 
in a sling — in this way, you won't have any trouble with Miss Wehlan 
when she wants to know where the cut is. 

5. Students are required to report back to Surgery clinic when the dis- 
pensary is finished — once upon a time, a student did. 

MILTON ACKERMAN. 




212 







213 



= 1940 



MEDIC 



THE RIP VAN WINKLE 
LETHARGIC SOCIETY 



This society was founded in our Freshman year at Hahnemann by a group 
of progressive students who realized that in the intensive training to which 
medical students are subjected, there must be some time alloted to rest (the 
hours from nine to five daily is the time they had in mind). The only require- 
ment for membership in the society is the ability to sleep for one-half hour on 
an amphitheatre seat without falling off. The society holds meetings on the 
least provocation — in fact all they need is someplace to sit or lie down. 

HONORARY FACULTY MEMBERS — for distinguished contributions toward 

the aims of the society. 

Dr. Frank Dr. Baker Dr. Horn 

Society Motto — "We Should Have Stood in Bed" 




214 




THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROTECTION 
OF SURPRISED SENIORS 



A group ol seniors banded together for the purpose of giving the year-book 
candid boys something to waste film on. Their aim is to never let the back of 
their head show in a picture, lest the folks want to know what they've been 
doing with all that money that they were supposed to be spending on haircuts. 
The society can be found holding a meeting anytime there is a candid camera 
within a radius of three blocks. 

Society Motto 
"Gee Whiz I'm Getting My Picture Taken and My Hair is a Sight" 



1940 



215 



SPECIALISTS 




MEDIC 



216 



SENIOR REFLECTIONS 

(Continued from Page 151) 
yards. . .and one of the boys. . .developed a taste. . .for the town's cockroaches 
. . .with beer as a chaser. . .and finally. . .it was our last afternoon. . .and we 
took an exam. . .and left the gloomy piles of the State Hospital behind us. . . 
and the school authorities . . . and the Allentown Police . . . and the hotel man- 
agement. . .uncrossed their fingers. . .for the week was up. . .and the town was 
standing. . .and nobody had been jailed. . .and it was. . .Christmas vacation 
. . .our last as students. . .and this time. . .when they asked us what to do. . . 
"about Johnny's cold". . .we demanded a blood count. . .and a chest plate. . . 
and a surgical consultation ... before we'd venture a word. . .and so. . .with 
our internship contracts signed . . . and without a care in the world . . . we re- 
turned to . . . 

January. • .Nineteen Forty. . .and still time on our hands. . .and why don't 
they hurry up and get this thing over with. . .and Dr. Ferguson was lecturing 
to what appeared to be ... a one-tenth section ... on Saturday mornings . . . 
while the rest of the class was apparently. . ."on OBS". . .and they switched 
ten week sections on us. . .putting all the boys to the trouble. . .of re-arranging 
their sleeping schedules ... in the morning ... so that they wouldn't conflict with 
roll-calls. . .in their new sections. . .and some of us. . .were beginning to won- 
der where Dr. VanLennep was finding all those gall bladders. . .or was that 
the same patient he was using every week . . . and the sample cabinet in the 
peliatrics dispensary . . . was supplying the fathers of the class . . . with every- 
thing for the formulae of their babies. . .but the bottles and nipples. . .and lo 
and behold. . .we had waited out a whole semester. . .and semester finals were 
with us. . .but the darts kept plunking in the board. . .and the pool balls kept 
clicking in Hering Hall. . .and the marathon heart and bridge games kept right 
on rolling. . .for the boys couldn't. . .and wouldn't be bothered. . .by the pros- 
pect of a few exams. . .after all these years. . .and even if we didn't know. . . 
where the cerebrospinal fluid. . .came from. . .or went to. . .they couldn't throw 
us out now. . .so we took them in stride. . .and settled down to waiting out. . . 

February. . .and the second semester. . .and we took over the dispensing 
of Strontium Bromide ... in Neurology dispensary . . . where the section preced- 
ing us . . . had left off . . . and we were being measured for caps and gowns . . . 
and filling out sheets of information . . . required for our diplomas . . . coming 
events were beginning to cast their shadows . . . and Dr. Ferguson . . . was lectur- 
ing on Rocky Mountain Fever. . .in a solitude as vast as those mountains. . . 
and morning Surgery section. . .was a place where three guys slept. . .eight 
guys read morning papers . . . two guys studied Dermatology . . . and everybody 
else . . . watching the operation . . . were probably Freshmen . . . and they stopped 
Industrial Medicine. . .and started Tropical Medicine. . .and the number of men 
on "OBS"... grew to undreamed of proportions. . .and we were a couple of 
yards of antigens . . . and a couple of miles of amboceptors . . . behind Dr. Sap- 
pington . . . and giving his department . . . enough laughs to last them all week 
... on those weekly roll quizzes . . . and the only man on the faculty . . . who 
wasn't sponsoring ... a senior society . . . appeared to be Mr. Hicks . . . and so . . . 
it was. . . 

March. . .and the only band. . .which hadn't been rumored for the Blue 
and Gold. . .was the Philadelphia Symphony. . .and Dr. VanLennep. . .was still 
taking out gall-bladders. . .for a mixed audience of. . .Brown Prep students. . . 
visiting high school science clubs. . .a few seniors with afternoon dates. . .and 
some strangers who just dropped in to get warm. . .and Dr. Crellin. . .had the 
boys looking under their beds at night. . .for T.B. bugs. . .and the heart game 



1940 



217 



MEDIC 



... in Hering Hall . . . showed no signs of slackening . . . and we were still wait- 
ing for elevators . . . and Miss Whalen . . . And in the meantime . . . we made the 
acquaintance ... of Hahnemann's member... of that great triumvirate ... of 
Homeopaths. . ."Einstein, Bernstein and Curie". . .and did our professor vibrate 
. . .and how he did. . .and so. . .we had wiled away. . .the second ten week 
section . . . and the year was two-thirds over . . . and to celebrate . . . we took some 
exams. . .giving some of the boys their first opportunity. . .to see. . .Dr. Doyle 
. . .and Dr. Roman. . .and Dr. Webster. . .and Dr. Craig's office neighbors. . . 
may have wondered a bit . . . why all those men were visiting him in the morn- 
ing. . .and we started our last ten week section. . .and weren't quite adjusted 
to our new sleeping schedule . . . when Easter intervened . . . and we went home 
. . .to try and convince the family. . .juts why we'd need as big an allowance 
. . . during our internships ... as we needed during our student days . . . Return- 
ing to. . .the tag end of March. . .and the home stretch of a year. . .which found 
the faculty showing more . . . and the class less concern . . . over the fate of the 
class of '40. . .and it was. . . 

April . . . and we knew it was Spring ... by the increased brilliancy of the 
sport coats ... of our Brown Prep companions ... at the Wednesday afternoon 
surgical clinics. . .and Dr. Snader was lecturing on the thyroid. . .to a select 
group on Saturday mornings . . . and Dr. Roman was removing them . . . before 
an even more select group ... on Saturday afternoons . . . and the weather grew 
warmer. . .tripling the fragrant aroma of lochia pads... and the flare of an 
occasional hot foot and the re-appearance of theback row marksmen in Neur- 
ology clinic. . .reminded us... of other springs which had passed. . .but for 
the most part . . . we clung to Hering Hall . . . and the pinball machine in the 
Luncheonette. . .and the "bull sessions" didn't stop. . .while they moved from 
the f rontof the cage ... to the Fifteenth street steps . . . and sidewalk . . . And 
finally .. .the gathering wrath of the faculty ... concerning the... "who cares" 
attitude ... of the class of Forty . . . reached its bursting point . . . and there was a 
class meeting... at which no one heckled. . .and no one complained. . .and 
we sat silent . . . and staring . . . and lost deep in our own troubled thoughts ... as 
the class president exploded a bombshell. . .in our midst. . .and for a day. . . 
the halls rang with conjecture. . .and worried groups. . .buzzed in low tones. . . 
throughout the corridors of the school. . .and hospital. . .and thus. . .was the 
"Club 21" born. . .and the happy-go-lucky Seniors. . .of but a week before. . . 
were all at once . . . worried . . . and hurt . . . and angry . . . and resentful . . . and 
concerned. . .and lecturers. . .who had become inured... to empty spaces... 
were overwhelmed ... by the hordes of Seniors. . .who hurriedly left. . .their 
beds. . .and their pool tables. . .and their dart boards. . .and their card games 
. . . their haste ... to convince the Medical Council . . . that they weren't possibly 
the guys they were thinking about. . .But even without the impetus of the 
Medical Council. . .the "I don't care" attitude. . .had been undergoing a slow 
transformation ... as most of use began to realize . . . that all the old familiar 
scenes ... to which we had grown accustomed over a four year period . . . were 
not to be with us much longer. . .So we went to a Blue and Gold. . .and got a 
little tight. . .perhaps because it's what we always did at Blue and Gold Balls 
. . .but more likely because it was our last. . .and we were a little bit saddened 
... by that thought . . . and finally . . . 

May. . .and it would soon be over. . .and we wanted to finish. . .and then 
again we didn't. . .and we detected the buds. . .of a beginning alumni spirit. . . 
as someone proudly discovered. . .an arm rest or seat back. . .on which he had 
playfully carved his initials back in the dim days of '36. . .or caught someone 
else . . . looking with fond regret ... at scenes about to be left behind . . . and the 
pool games . . . and the dart games . . . and the card games . . . seemed to take 
on a listlessness . . . imparted by the fact that after four years . . . they too would 



218 



soon be over. . .and in the meantime. . .the curricula gained momentum. . .as 
the faculty took their last crack. . .at making M.D.'s out of us. . .and maybe the 
Medical department. . .and all the other departments. . .weren't kidding... in 
those many warnings which they had passed out throughout the year. . .and 
the tribulations. . .suffered by the "Club 21". . .rose anew in our minds. . .and 
we began to worry about the session the Executive Committee was going to 
have ... on the evening of May 31... and the boys were scurrying ... to get 
their twelve deliveries under the line. . .and the papers. . .and themes. . .and 
case histories. . .which should have been written months before. . .and finally 
. . .weary. . .and tired. . .and happy. . .and sad. . .and apprehensive. . .and un- 
concerned . . . we came to the end . . . and . . . 

June. . .and a busy two weeks' bustle. . .of alumni dinners. . .and gradua- 
tion rehearsals. . .and invitations to mail. . .and friends to bid good-bye to. . . 
and arrangements to make. . .and finally .. .June 13... and the Academy of 
Music... and a long and devious way. . .from the Elkins Amphitheatre ... of 
September, 1936. . .and as we repeated. . .after the Dean. . ."I swear by Apollo 

the physician, and Aesculapius "...the last vestiges of our youth... 

seemed to drop from us. . .and. . .the "babes in the woods". . .were physicians. 

MILTON ACKERMAN. 



1940 



219 



MEDIC 



THINGS WE WOULD LIKE TO SEE 

Stoner and Meyers in a spirited debate. 
Dr. Craig on a roller-coaster. 
Abbott doing the Conga. 
Harrison licking a lollipop. 
Burns at a Sunday School picnic. 
Dr. Bernstein playing checkers with Dr. Boericke. 
Dr. Hepburn beating up a policeman. 
Kissen and Hoyt in a telephone booth together. 
Dr. Beutner roller skating down Broad Street. 
Counihan as a district attorney. 
Sanabria as a sex-mad killer. 
Dr. Sappington leading a swing band. 

DeCaro and DiMassa playing the leads in Romeo and Juliet. 
Dr. Agerty as the Phantom of the Opera. 
Dr. Chandler playing Macbeth. 
Dr. Ferguson running a medicine show. 

Aberant, Amato, Cetta, Ciotola, and Cortese impersonating the Dionne quin- 
tuplets. 
H. H. Evans as Dean of a girls seminary. 
Weber running a lingerie shop. 
Dr. Crellin as an automobile salesman. 
Mike and Carlos as president and vice-president of the Prohibition party. 

FAMOUS LAST WORDS 

Dr. Beutner's — "Vare is Mistur Peck today?" 

Minerva's — "Get off ya knees." 

Sumer's — "Class meeting." 

Dr. Chandler's — "Has Mr. Chiezselski come in yet?" 

Ehrhart's — "When do I get my yearbook?" 

Cavalli's — "G'wan yer crazy." 

Counihan's — "Well in the article I read, Doctor." 

Leonard's — "Tilt." 

Dr. Carpenter's — "Abbott, Aberant, Ackerman, ." 

Elcaness's — "Who threw that?" 

Dr. Steinhilber's — "The worst set of examination papers ." 



Dr. Reimann's — "Get them talking over the back fence." 

Dr. Boericke's — "What do you find in their diapers?" 

Dr. Lafferty's — "Now we'll hear from Dr. Canton." 

Hoyt's — -"That reminds me of the time I had down in Ohio one night. 

Dr. Wells's — "And if you don't have a Yater." 

Dr. Sappington's — "We'll answer a few questions now." 

Mr. Kratz's — "Oh yes, the microscope fee too." 

Hains's — "I'd like to see them bust me out." 

Miss Fisher's — "Will all the New Jersey boys see me." 



220 



THE LAST ROUND-UP 



Marin (you know — the Bellevue Marin) — at Allentown Hospital- 
"Honest — you'd think they'd go crazy up here." 



Abbott (Sleeping Beauty) — 

"Welllll — I always eliminate syphilis, tuberculosis, and cancer first. 



The Evans boys — this is to be repeated in unison — 

"I thought my partner was going to prepare that part of the case, Dr. Wells. 



Ernie DiMassa — indulges in some subtle repartee with a patient- 
"Did you ever have a sore on your ?" 



It happened in Pediatrics dispensary — 

Dr. Redman — demonstrating a case of pyloric stenosis — "To prove our 
diagnosis, we will give the child a bit of water to drink, and we will then 
observe a peristaltic wave, and in a short time, another peristaltic wave." 
McDonough (getting in his ten cents worth) — "And where does the first 
wave go to, Dr. Redman." 



This one was in Gyn dispensary — 

Marin (the Bellevue Marin of course) — "But Dr. Frosch, there is really no 
great difference in the pathology between myoma and myomata, is there"? 
Dr. Frosch (paternally and with patience) — "My dear boy, the term myo- 
mata is plural for the term myoma." 



Who was the guy who wanted to know what the blood P.O.N, concentration 
was in uremia. 



Dr. Boericke — "Define the term anamnesis?" 

Benko — "Well Doctor, an means without, and amnesis means vomiting- 
so I guess it means — without vomiting." 



Remember the day that the suction apparatus went blooey in G-U dispensary 

just as Dr. Ashcraft was getting ready to tap a kidney — 

Dr. Ashcraft — "Well — what am I supposed to drain this cavity with?" 
H. H. Evans (sotto voice) — "Why not try a soda straw, Doctor." 



1940 



221 



THE FINAL EXAMINATION 



A general intelligence test for the 10. 

members of the class of 1940. 

(Ed. Note: Knowing what the general 
intelligence of the class of 1940 is — we 
are including the answers also). 

1 . Name five ways in which the name \ \ _ 
Buechle may be pronounced? 

Answer: (a) Bushelly, (b) Bukel, (c) 
Beekle, (d) Butchly, (e) Bugle. 

2. Who invited the Dermatology sec- 
tion up to watch a skin grafting? 
Answer: H. H. Evans — perish the 
thought fellows, perish the thought! 

3. Who smacked Elcaness with the 12. 
wet mop that day in Bac. Lab? 

Answer: Nobody — it was just a 
nasty Republican plot to discredit 
one of the CCNY boys. 13 

4. If Lenahan had four apples and 
gave two to Shaughnessy — what 
would Shaughnessy have? 
Answer: A surprised expression. 

5. What ever happend to Rogokos? 
Ansker: Maybe he fell into one of 
those incisions in surgery clinic. 

6. What two seniors are that way 
about each other? 
Answer: Darnell and Abbott (and 
by thataway we mean like Ger- 
many and England). 

7. Why is Mussolini so happy and 
contented these days? 

Answer: Cavalli is on this side of 
the Atlantic. 

8. Ev Goyannes is walking north on 
Broad Street from City Hall — what 

time is it? 17. 

Answer: About eleven A. M. 

9. What two men in the class remind 
you of the title of a well-known 
book? 18. 
Answer: Strauss — "Shadow 

and and 

Stranse — Substance". 



14. 



15. 



16. 



Is the statement — "Nobody loves a 
bald man" — true or false? 
Answer: Weber and Kissen are 
married and they must have taken 
the 4 r hais off sometime during the 
couitship. 

Select the proper word to complete 
this statement — Mike and Carlos 
drink nothing but — (a) Eagle Brand 
Milk, (b) Orange Juice, (c) Dextri- 
maltose, (d) Similac? 
Answer: Either something is lack- 
ing there, or we have the wrong im- 
pression about what's being served 
in bars around town. 

Name an allergy, and the class 

member possessing it? 

Answer: Gross — he's allergic to 

silence. 

What does the word Schifalacqua 

mean? 

Answer: It is an old Indian term 

meaning — I've-never-seen-such-a- 

lousy-bridge-hand. 

If Scharf had three darts which he 
threw at the dart board — what 
would the dart board have? 
Answer: A blank look. 
Do you believe in hypnotism? 
Answer: No — but there must be 
SOME explanation for Abbott's be- 
havior. 

Complete this statement: "I'm prac- 
tically speechless, said ." (a) 

Cavalli, (b) Scharf, (c) Meltzer, (d) 
DeCaro? 

Answer: As they say in the Neur- 
ology department — some questions 
are wrong no matter how you ans- 
wer them. 

Will Roosevelt be re-elected for a 

third term? 

Answer: He will if Verga gives the 

word. 

Which would you rather have — a 
gastric ulcer or Elcaness? 
Answer: Well — we know some very 
nice gastric ulcers. 



224 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The process of compiling, editing, and publishing a yearbook is a difficult 
task; when to this is added the necessity of doing a thorough job with the diffi- 
cult Senior medical curriculum, the problems of an editor seem at times un- 
surmountable. 

Therefore, in acknowledgment of those whose ready help and advice aid- 
ed materially in the completion of this book; we give grateful thanks to: — 

Mr. Frank Veri, the Business Manager, and those of his staff who contri- 
buted towards making this book a financial success. 

Those members of the editorial staff who responded to the frequent calls 
of the editor for some assistance. 

Mr. Armand F. Verga for his counsel and cooperation. 

Dr. Wm. A. Pearson, Dr. Russel H. Fisher, Dr. Carl C. Fischer, and Dr. Henry 
D. Lafferty for their friendly counsel. 

Mr. Wallace K. Kratz for the numerous tips he gave us; and Miss Clara C. 
Fisher for her advice and the mass of stenographic detail of which she 
relieved us. 

Miss Betty Rubenstone for the many hours she devoted to stenographic 
work, copy reading, and the compiling of the dummy. 

Mr. Frank Boles of the Philadelphia-Weeks Engraving Company of whom 
we can truthfully say that without the hours he so willingly gave in assist- 
ance to the editor, the publishing of this yearbook would not have been 
possible. 

Mr. Max Merin of Merin-Baliban Photographers for his friendly coopera- 
tion. 

Mr. Ed Schlechter of the Schlechter Printing company for his cooperation, 
advice, and patience. 

Mr. Twist of National Publishing Company for his aid in the completion 
of the cover of this publication. 

To all these, and to all the others not mentioned whose friendly interest in 
the book, made the task of the editor so much lighter, we say, thanks again. 

MILTON ACKERMAN 

Editor-in-Chief 



t t 

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The following pages reveal the 

financial success of your 

1940 Medic 



\ ' ' I i| .1 I- ■■ V' '1 || 

v 



has aided greatly in making this publication possible. 



FRANK A. VERI, Business Manager. 



♦ There is more to a book than its cover, a few pages, £ 

♦*♦ *♦* 

♦ pictures, and cold black type. No doubt, you may know % 

♦ that many supporters are necessary for the production of y 

♦ y 

♦{♦ a yearbook that you will cherish forever. The Class of x 



•|j 1940 of The Hahnemann Medical College has been for- 
y tunate in having such numerous friends. % 



: 



y 

We wish to express our sincere thanks to the patrons, y 

X 
to the subscribers to professional cards, and to the adver- % 

tisers for their generous and whole-hearted support which % 



We owe a debt of gratitude also to the alumni and to * 

♦!< 
the entire student body for their earnest cooperation which * 

they have contributed so willingly. ;< 



So that you may know specifically the names of our •»; 

♦5 

supporters, we invite you read the following pages. y 



.939-1940 



4 1 

4 t 

? ALUMNI ASSOCIATION J 

4 v 

4 OFFICERS ♦ 

♦ 
f 
y 

♦ President — Dr. William L. Martin, 15 ♦ 

*•• 11/ 4* 

♦ First Vice-President — Dr. N. Volney Ludwick, 26 ♦> 

♦ Second Vice-President — Dr. Homer Snyder, 13 v 

♦ Third Vice-President— Dr. Everett A. Tyler, '13 * 
a ♦:♦ 

♦ Treasurer — Dr. Richard W. Larer, 98 y 

y i y 

♦ Executive Secretary — Dr. Carl C. Fischer, '28 y 

4 y 

4 y 

$ BOARD OF TRUSTEES ? 

| Chairman— Dr. William D. Culin, '94 J 

% Dr. James M. Godfrey '04 Dr. Wayne T. Killian '06 $ 

| Dr. Charles B. Hollis '12 Dr. Newlin F. Paxson '19 & 

% Dr. John E. James '02 Dr. Joseph W. Post '09 & 

% Dr. Francis T. Krusen '14 Dr. E. Roland Snader '21 X 

y y 

£ On December 4, 1884, an association of the graduates of The !♦! 

£ Homoeopathic Medical College of Philadelphia and The Hahnemann *:* 

•:• Medical College and Hospital of Philadelphia was first organized with ♦ 

% the declared objects of promoting the interests and extending the in- X 

*:* fluence of the Alma Mater, encouraging a high standard of medical X 

4 education, securing intellectual and social benefits for alumni and per- •♦• 

£ petuating college memories. ♦♦. 

y y 

*:* On December 22, 1931, the Association was incorporated under £ 

•♦• the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. y 

••♦ ♦•♦ 

♦J. Early in 1935 an Alumni Office was established in the College as •{♦ 

*:* a center for all alumni activities, under the direction of the Board of % 

••• Trustees of the Association, through the Executive Secretary. £ 

.♦♦ In addition to the annual Reunion Banquet held the evening of ♦ 

X Commencement, the Alumni Office keeps a biographical file of all $ 

*:* alumni, maintains a location bureau and serves in general as an active *:* 

4 place of contact between the college and the alumni. A "Hahnemann ♦ 

2 Alumni News" has been created to bring to all of the alumni four times X 

X yearly news of the college and of their brother alumni. X 

♦:♦ 4 

♦ In recent years further efforts have been extended looking toward y 

*•! the creation of District Alumni Clubs throughout the country. At the ♦!♦ 

£ present time permanent organizations exist in Western Pennsylvania, X 

♦ Northeastern Pennsylvania, New Haven, Conn., Cleveland Ohio, and *:* 
•:♦ Metropolitan New York and Philadelphia. It is planned to establish 4 
X similar groups in other districts this year. 



t 

I 

! Patrons to 1940 Medic 



Dr. Leon T. Ashcraft 
Dr. Frank C. Benson, Sr. 
Dr. Garth W. Boricke 
Dr. John A. Brooke 
Dr. J. V. F. Clay 
Dr. Earl B. Craig 
Dr. Harry M. Eberhard 
Dr. Grant O. Favorite 
Dr. Gerald P. Fincke 
Dr. Carl C. Fischer 
Miss Clara C. Fisher 
Dr. H. Russell Fisher 
Dr. Benjamin K. Fletcher 
Dr. Jacob W. Frank 
Dr. Charles C. Hollis 
Dr. J. Arthur Horneff 
Dr. Henry I. Klopp 
Mr. Wallace K. Kratz 
Dr. Henry D. Lafferty 
Dr. Leopold S. Lipsitz 



Dr. Herman J. Lubowitz 

Dr. J. F. McClendon 

Dr. Joseph W. McEldowney 

Dr. Warren C. Mercer 

Dr. George P. Miley 

Dr. Isaiah L. Moyer 

Dr. E. A. Parker 

Dr. William A. Pearson 

Dr. Thomas W. Phillips 

Dr. C. Sigmund Raue 

Dr. Stanley P. Reimann 

Dr. J. L. Roth 

Dr. Henry S. Ruth 

Dr. Samuel W. Sappington 

Dr. C. W. Schaffer 

Dr. James D. Schofield 

Dr. Thomas M. Snyder 

Dr. Gustave A. VanLennep 

Dr. Frederic J. von Rapp 

Dr. G. Harlan Wells 



.k'W^H^-H^^^W^H^^-M^K-K^H-K-^H^ 



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PROFESSIONAL CARDS 



N. ARIANO, JR., D.D.S. 

Dentistry 

207 North Fifteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


ALFRED S. DAMIANI, M.D. 

Obstetrics and General Practice 

142 East Alleheny Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


RALPH BERNSTEIN, M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Skin Diseases Exclusively 

1816 Pine Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


EVERETT H. DICKINSON, 

M.D., F.A.C.S. 

General and Neurological Surgery 

250 South Eihgteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


JAMES B. BERT, M.D. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

1512 West Oxford Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


THOMAS L. DOYLE, M.D., F.A.C.S. 

Plastic and General Surgery 

230 South Nineteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


EDWARD W. CAMPBELL, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 

Urology 

Medical Arts Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


HARRY D. EVANS. M.D. 

Roentgenology 

1120 North Sixty-third Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


EUGENE F. CARPENTER, M.D. 

Surgery 

1433 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


CARL C. FISCHER, M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Pediatrics 

Germantown Professional Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


JOSEPH CHANDLER, A.B., Ph.D. 

Blood Analysis 

235 North Fifteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


MORRIS FITERMAN, M.D. 

6152 Spruce Street 

255 South Seventeenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


HUNTER S. COOK, M.D. 

Pathology and Bacteriology 

Hahnemann Hospital 

By Appointment 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


RICHARD R. GATES, M.D. 

General Practice and Obstetrics 

Drexel and Marvine Avenues 

DREXEL HILL. PA. 


J. ANTRIM CRELLIN, M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Diseases of Chest Exclusively 

1930 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


THEODORE C. GEARY, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 

Surgery 

255 South Seventeenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



*•♦*♦•*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦**♦**♦**••*♦**♦**♦•*♦**♦**♦**♦**♦*•♦**♦**♦**♦**♦**♦**♦*% ■ • ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ■ • ' ♦ ~ • ' ♦ ' • ' ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ « ♦ * ♦ ♦ ♦**«**«*%*%**«*%**»*****«**»**^********^ 

! PROFESSIONAL CARDS ! 



MELVILLE A. GOLDSMITH, M.D. 

Medicine 

400 Cottman St„ Jenkintown, Pa. 

Medical Arts Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

CARROLL F. HAINES, M.D. 

Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat 

1409 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

EDMUND G. HE5SERT, M.D. 

Gynecology 

417 Cooper Street 

CAMDEN, N. J. 

WILLIAM C. HUNSICKER, JR., M.D 

Urology 

255 South Seventeenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

JULES J. KLAIN, M.D. 

Physio-Therapy 

1516 North Seventeenth Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

HERMAN KLINE, M.D. 

2643 Pacific Avenue 
(Cor. California Avenue) 
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J. 

HENRY D. LAFFERTY, M.D., 
F.A.C.S. 

Obstetrics and Gynecology 

250 South Eighteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

LOWELL L. LANE. M.D., F.A.C.P. 

Internal Medicine 

Medical Arts Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



WILLIAM Y. LEE, M.D. 

Surgery - Peritoneoscopy 

Hours by Appointment 10 A. M.-12 Noon 

1113 Medical Arts Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

GEORGE LORENZ, JR.. M.D. 

Gastro-Enterology 

1930 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

RUSSELL S. MAGEE. M.D. 

Medicine and Surgery 

201 White Horse Pike 

AUDUBON, N. J. 

WILLIAM L. MARTIN, M.D. 

General Surgery 

1737 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

RUSSELL K. MATTERN, M.D. 

6840 Ogontz Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ROBERT J. McNEIL, M.D. 

Obstetrics and General Practice 

5148 Wayne Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

FRANK H. MURRAY, M.D. 

Coloproctology 

Medical Tower Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

ALBERT MUTCH, M.D. 

Obstetrics 

124 West Logan Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 






PROFESSIONAL CARDS 



*** 

* R. C. OVENS, M.D. 

♦ 

... 

.J. 675 Bergen Avenue 
♦ 

* JERSEY CITY, N, J. 
y 


WILLIAM M. SYLVIS, M.D., 

F.A.C.S. 

Surgery 

1930 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


NEWLIN F. PAXSON, M.D. 
*£ Obstetrics and Gynecology 
250 South Eighteenth Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


EVERETT A. TYLER. M.D. 

Anesthesia 

Medical Arts Building 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


| FREDERICK C. PETERS, M.D. 

!•! Ophthalmology 
•!♦ 

♦ Physicians' Building 
<• PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


MICHELE VIGLIONE, M.D. 

331 South Eighteenth Street 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


JOHN L. REDMAN, M.D. 
!> Pediatrics 
* 331 South Eighteenth Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


CHARLES W. URSPRUNG, M.D.. 

F.A.C.S. 

General Surgery 

415 West James Street 

LANCASTER, PA. 


GEORGE J. RILLING, M.D. 
* 5750 Rising Sun Avenue 
!> PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


HARRY S. WEAVER, JR., M.D. 

Ophthalmology 

1433 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 


% WILLIAM G. SCHMIDT 

X Law Applying to Patents in Medicine, 

Pharmacy, Chemical Engineering 
>> 414 East Allen's Lane 
£ PHILADELPHIA, PA. 
% Che. 0883 


G. HARLAN WELLS, M.D. 

Internal Medicine - Diagnosis 

Hours: 9 to 12:30 

1627 Spruce Street 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 


% JACOB H. SIGAFOOS, M.D. 
£ Anesthesia 
? 1700 Diamond Street 
* PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


CHARLES J. WHITE, M.D. 
Medical Arts Building 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


:jl CLARENCE L. SHOLLENBERGER, 
% M.D., F.A.C.S. 
»> Surgery 
% 662 South Highland Avenue 
MERION, PA. 


HORACE L. WEINSTOCK, M.D. 

Urology 

1930 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA. PA. 




*7<4e <Jto4ne &jf 



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DRUCO-OPTUS 

DRUG PRODUCTS 



THE STANDARD OF QUALITY AND VALUE 



Sold by Registered Pharmacists 
Who Display This Seal 




PHILADELPHIA WHOLESALE DRUG CO. 

PHILADELPHIA 



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COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 






IN CORPORATED 



Our passenger ss BARBARA, which serves a regular schedule 
between BALTIMORE, PHILADELPHIA, and PUERTO RICO every three 
vveeks, is characterized by its gentle Puerto Rican hospitality. 

We also maintain a freight service to Puerto Rico with weekly 
sailings from BALTIMORE. 



BALTIMORE INSULAR LINE 

OFFICES: PIER 5, PRATT STREET 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



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"«*%™r»" 



EXPLOITATION of the 

MEDICAL PROFESSION 



E 



VERYWHERE it is rampant — newsapers, magazines, billboards, radio. "Your 
doctor will tell you that ..." "Medical science has found that . . . ." "The 
greatest specialists in Timbutoo say that ..." And the rest of he story is, of 
course, "Use our pills or our vitamins three times a day; ask your doctor." 



You are forced to compete with those who offer your patients free advice regard- 
ing medical treatment. You deliver Mrs. Blank's baby today, and tomorrow she 
will receive by mail samples of baby foods with complete directions how to use 
them. Indeed, some physicians representing a commercial organization and 
knowing that the case is in your hands may address a personal letter to your 
patient offering his services free. 



It has been said that ten more years of the present trend of interference in 
medical practice will do away with the need for private practice of infant feeding 
and other branches of medicine. 



Mead Johnson & Company have always believed that the feeding and care of 
babies and growing children is an individual problem that can best be controlled 
by the individual physician. For over twenty years and in dozens of ethical ways 
we have given practical effect to this creed. We hold the interest of the medical 
profession higher than our own, for we too, no doubt, could sell more of our 
products were we to advertise them directly to the public. 

• • • 

So long as medical men tacitly encourage the present trend, so long will serious 
inroads continue to be made into private medical practice. When more physicians 
specify MEAD'S Products when indicated, more babies will be fed by physicians 
because Mead Johnson & Company earnestly co-operate with the medical pro- 
fession along strictly ethical lines and never exploit the medical profession. 



■jfDextri-M altos Nos. i, 2 and 3; Dcxtri-Maltosc With Ex- 
tracts of Wheat Embryo and yeast (formerly Dextri-Maltose 
with Vitamin D); Mead's Viosterol in Oil; Mead's Cod Liver 
Oil with Viosterol; Mead's Standardised Cod Liver OH; Pab 
lum; Mead's Cereal; Mead's Brewers Yeast (powder and tab- 
lets) ; Mead's Powdered Lactic Acid Milk Nos. 1 and 2; Mead's 
Oil; Mead's Viosterol in Halibut Liver OH (liquid and 
Milk; Casec; Sobee; Cemac; Mead's Halibut Liver capsules). 




Atmosphere of GREATNESS 

plus unsurpassed facilities and mercial life of Philadelphia, 

services for functions of any It is where important events 

size and type, make this world- happen and outstanding 

famoushotel thecenter around people stay. It offers all the 

which revolves the really luxuries of modern comfort — 

important social and com- at reasonable rates. 



AIR-CONDITIONED 
RESTAURANTS 



BELLEVUE 
STRATFORD 

IN PHILADELPHIA 

CLAUDE H. BENNETT, General Manager 



Since i 876 y 

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♦ 

WILLIAMS STANDARD * 

$ 



INTERNE SUITS 

First Always in Quality And Service 



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FOLDERS ON REQUEST V 

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C. D. Williams & Co. 

Designers and Manufacturers 
246 South Sixteenth Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



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,**** *♦*%**♦**♦* ••*%**♦*♦**•**»**♦**•*>**•* ♦"•*>"•♦"*••♦ *#**♦**♦**♦**♦"♦*%"♦"»"♦"♦♦••♦* ♦♦♦♦•♦♦••♦♦♦♦*•*♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦•♦•♦♦♦• •"♦ 



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It's Time You Owned 

a BELL & HOWELL 




MOVIE CAMERA 



A HELP IN YOUR PROFESSION 
A GREAT HOBBY 



It's time you owned a really fine 
camera, for movies can be more than 
a recreation . . . they can be used to 
advance yourself in your profession. 
Your movies, however, can be no bet- 
ter than the camera with which you 
make them. 

With a Filmo you'll have a camera 
so precise that professional results with 
amateur ease are assured ... so versa- 
tile that every movie opportunity can 
be captured. You can make films that 
will be in demand at medical meetings. 

So, get a Filmo, precision-made by 
the makers of Hollywood's professional 
equipment, now. Easy terms available. 



Filmos are basic cameras which will 
keep pace with your progress. 




■ "Shelloading!" No Threading of Film! 



the SHELLOADING 16mm. Filmo 

The Perfect Movie Camera for Everyone — 



a 



This trim, pocket-fitting 16mm. camera gives you unusual 
versatility and almost automatic ease of operation. It "shel- 
loads" with pre-threaded 16mm. film magazines. Permits 
mid-reel changes from color to black-and-white. Has built- 
in, damage-proof, "positive" viewfinder which eliminates 
off-center pictures even if your eye wanders! Has four 
speeds and single frame exposure. Uses all special lenses. 
With one-inch F 2.7 lens . . . $115. 

To show your movies at their best, use precision-built 
Bell & Howell Filmo projectors. 



The Home of Motion Picture Equipment 

Williams, Browm & Earlc, Inc. 



918 CHESTNUT STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PENNypacker 7320 



MAin 7261 



COVERS FOR THE 

1940 MEDIC 

Manufactured by 

National Publishing Co. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Manufacturers of DeLuxe Year Book 
Covers and Loose-Leaf Binders 



STREET 
UNDER & 
PROPERT 

OPTICIANS 

20th and 
Chestnut 
Streets 

Philadelphia 



Nitrous Oxide Oxygen 

The Ohio Chemical and 
Manufacturing Company 

Oxygen Tent Rental Service 

3623-25 Brandywine Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Miller, Bain, Bayer & Co. 

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS 

1001-1003 FILBERT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Established igoo 
Medical Book Department 

THE REILLY BOOK STORE 

133 NORTH THIRTEENTH ST. 

PHILADELPHIA 



JOHN A. BORNEMAN 
AND SONS 

Thirty-eight years' practical experience in manufacturing 
Homeopathic Remedies. 

Up-to-date in all matters pharmaceutical. The necessity 
for ultra purity in strictly Homeopathic remedies is recog- 
nized and constantly practiced. 

Manufacturing a full line of Tinctures, Tablet Triturates, 
Compressed Tablets, Ointments, and Specialties that 
produce dependable results. 



Laboratories: 

Norwood, 

Delaware County, Pa. 



Philadelphia Address: 
248 N. 15th Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



STUDENT OUTFIT ORDERS A SPECIALTY 



.......... .... - . « • 

► »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• ♦.♦*»• 



FRANK L. LAGAN 



GEO. H. McCONNELL 



PHILADELPHIA SURGICAL INSTRUMENT CO. 

— DISTRIBUTORS — 

• HAMILTON MODERN MEDICAL FURNITURE 

• ROYAL CHROME WAITING ROOM SUITES 

• WAPPLER SHORT WAVE DIATHERMY 



Write us for Location Data and Office Planning Service 



KIT. 3613-14 



1717 SANSOM ST. 



HOMEOPATHIC PHARMACISTS 

116 South Eleventh Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



FRESH PLANT TINCTURES 

TINCTURE TABLETS 

COMBINATION TABLETS 

SPECIALTIES 

MEDICINE CASES 

We solicit initial orders of Physician 
entering into the practice of mericine. 

CATALOGUE MAILED ON REQUEST 

Publishers of 

BOERICKE'S MATERIA MEDICA 

Ninth Edition 



Medical Surgical Supplies 

PHILADELPHIA HOSPITAL 
SUPPLY COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 

Custom Built Physicians 

Wood Furniture 

264 SOUTH SIXTEENTH STREET 

Phone: PENnypacker 1665 
Trusses Surgical Belts 



BELLE VISTA 
SANATORIUM 

Open to the Profession 
Germantown Avenue and City Line 

Convalescent and Mild Mental 

Inspection Invited 
Chestnut Hill 1600 



NATIONAL ACADEMIC 
CAP & GOWN COMPANY 

821-23 Arch Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

• ALL CAPS AND GOWNS 
USED AT THIS SCHOOL 
SUPPLIED BY US. 

>♦♦♦•>♦♦♦>♦•>♦♦♦♦>♦♦•>»>♦♦♦ ••:*•>•>•>♦■ 



SCIENTIFIC EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 



3527-31 LANCASTER AVENUE 


i 


PHILADELPHIA 


•> 


• Microscopes 




• Laboratory Apparatus 


i 


• Chemicals 


♦ 


• Reagents 


♦ 
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The American Institute 

of 

Homeopathy . . . 



welcomes Hahnemann graduates to fellowship in the nation's oldest 
national medical society. 

You will never regret early association with your national society. 
It represents your profession nationally, and offers through its monthly 
Journal and annual meetings invaluable post-graduate opportunities. 

Special arrangements for the membership of recent graduates have 
been made by the trustees. 

A. I. H. application forms for membership may be had at the 
Dean's office. 

JOIN UPON GRADUATION 



KERMAN & DEVINE 

PHARMACISTS 



Where the Hahnemann Boys Meet 
When in Town. 

S. E. Cor. Eleventh and Spruce Sts. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Realthful Recreation 
Agreeable Fellowship 

Acquire and Regularly Practice the 

GYM — SWIM — PLAY HABIT 

in the 

CENTRAL Y. M. C. A. 



1421 Arch Street 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Central Club Residence provides facili- 
ties for Men, Women, Married Couples, 
at Moderate Prices. 



HAHNEMANN 
LUNCHEONETTE 

246 North Fifteenth Street 

A Pleasant Place to Rest and Eat 

MR. and MRS. PAUL 



STATIONERS and PRINTERS 
THE 

ADAMS - LESSACK CO. 

College Supplies our Specialty 

"No School Item too Hard to Get 
at Any Time" 

145 North Fifteenth Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Loc 1133 Race 1335 



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••*••*♦*•**•*••*»**••*»**♦•♦♦•*•«*•♦*♦♦*♦**♦♦*»**♦♦*♦♦*♦ 






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BUalft, & ^boJune 



PHARMACEUTICALS 



MULFORD BIOLOGICALS 



DION'S 

LUNCHEONETTE 

220 NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 

Our Slogan 

"Quality at Moderate Prices" 

PETE'SBARBERSHOP 

THE STUDENT'S SHOP 

Below the College 
NORTH FIFTEENTH STREET 



RICHARD YOUNG 

Physicians and Hospital Supplies 

Surgical Instruments of Quality 

Trusses, Elastic Stockings 

Arch Supports and 

Rubber Goods 

214 North Fifteenth Street 

Phone RITtenhouse 6635 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Club Breakfasts 



Platter Luncheons 



Special Dinner Platters 
From 20c to 50c 

WILLIAMS' RESTAURANT 

326 North Broad Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Quick and Pleasant Service 

Piping Hot Coffee Delicious Desserts 
Open 24 Hours 



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BEST WISHES FROM THE 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

• BENZEDRINE INHALER 

• BENZEDRINE SOLUTION 

• PENTNUCLEOTIDE 

Accepted by the Council on Pharmacy and 
Chemistry of the American Medical Association 

Smith, Kline & French Laboratories 



Philadelphia, Penna. 
Established 1841 



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L. M. SHEAFFER 

CLOISTERDALE FARM 
IlCj-Oo 

EPHRATA, PENNA. 



THE 

HOOVER - SMITH 

COMPANY 

726 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA 

FRATERNITY JEWELERS 

SCIENTIFIC PEST CONTROL AND 
SANITATION 

VOGEL- RlTT .nc. 

EXTERMINATING COMPANY 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

2212 CHESTNUT STREET 

Locust 1828 Race 1812 



Fre. 5774 Race 9641 

Achenbach & Butler, Inc. 

1508-10 BRANDYWINE STREET 

Heat and Cold Insulation Contractors 
RU-BER-OID WATSON 

85% Magnesia Covering 
Insulating Material Supplied and In- 
stalled by us in the new Hahnemann 
Medical College Building 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

ELITE DRUG CO., Inc. 

329 NORTH BROAD STREET 

We Deliver Call Lorn. 3438 



CAMERAS 

4j*} Evetyihh9$hotographie 

KLEIN & GOODMAN 

18 S ? l6th Street Phila., Pa. 



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LORRAINE HOTEL 



Broad and Fairmount Ave. 



Special Rates to Students and Nurses 

LARGE AIRY ROOMS 

SINGLE OR SUITES OF 2, 3, & 4 ROOMS 

DIRECTION: METROPOLITAN HOTEL CORP. 



GLADSTONE HOTEL 

11th & Pine Streets 



FRANK G. STEWART 
COMPANY 



BUILDING 
CONSTRUCTION 



1520 LOCUST STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Compliments 
of 

THE 



ATLANTIC REFINING 
COMPANY 



PETROLEUM 
PRODUCTS 



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COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



A FRIEND 



WM.W.DUGAN&SONS 

WHOLESALE 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Progressive Quaker City 
Life Insurance Company 

1812 Market Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

GEORGE SUTTON, Secretary 



WILLIAM A. WEAVER 

HOSPITAL and INSTITUTIONAL 

EQUIPMENT 

6742 LAWNTON AVENUE 

PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



LEDERLE & COMPANY 

J. HARRIS TYRE— Succeeding 
ENGINEERS — CONTRACTORS 

Steel — Ornamental Iron 
Witherspoon Bldg., Philadelphia 

Pennypacker 1274 Reg. Prof. Eng. 

Brown's Cafeterias and Bars 

Full Line of 

IMPORTED LIQUORS and WINES 

HOME COOKED FOOD 

804 Arch St. & N. E. Cor. Broad & Race 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



F. W. HOFFMAN & CO., Inc. 

35-37 SOUTH FOURTH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 




N.W. COR. 16th a WALNUT STS. 
PHILADELPHIA 

JOHN J. FELDENS 
CHARLES KIENLE 

GUILDCRAFT OPTICIANS 

27 South Nineteenth Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

SPRuce 2719 Race 6078 



PIERRE UNIFORMS 

MANUFACTURERS AND DESIGNERS 

QUALITY INTERNE SUITS 

224-226 SOUTH ELEVENTH STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

You Are Entitled to the Best 
Insist On Pierre's To Be Sure To Get It. 

EVERY GARMENT GUARANTEED TO GIVE COMPLETE SATISFACTION. 



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Established 1810 



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Printers of the tr 1940 ^Medic" 




540 HAMILTON STREET 



ALLENTOWN, PA. 



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£ 



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IS A CREDIT TO THE STAFF 



OUR S P E 



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Originality in Design 
Organized Layout *i 



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E R V I CE 



Quality beyond question 

Past records of successful performance 

Largest and up-to-the-minute produc- 
tion facilities 

Many years"' experience 



PHILADELPHIA-WEEKS 
ENGRAVING COMPANY 

(Oaucaltonai LJjeparimeni 



29 NORTH SIXTH STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



MERIN-BALIBAN 



1010 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



Official Photographers 
for the 1940 Medic 



SPECIALISTS TO SCHOOLS — f 

*♦* 
♦> 

COLLEGES — UNIVERSITIES — CLUBS * 



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SPECIAL RATES TO STUDENTS